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Book Review: It Starts With Food, by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig
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June 12, 2012
2:01 am
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Buy "It Starts With Food" from Amazon

What Is The "Whole 30"?

There are two approaches to "going Paleo": the "taper off" approach, in which you eliminate non-Paleo foods from your life in multiple steps as you feel ready, and the "boot camp/detox" approach, in which you commit to a completely new diet all at once.

The most vocal and successful proponents of the boot camp/detox approach to Paleo are Dallas and Melissa Hartwig. In their "Whole30" program, you commit to eating 100% strict Paleo for 30 days. No cheat days, no 80/20 rule, no white rice or white potatoes, no exceptions. The purpose of It Starts With…

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June 12, 2012
3:28 am
anand srivastava
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I didn't understand the difference between clarified butter and ghee.

I though clarified butter is butter with only the butter fat. Which is the same as ghee.

What is the real difference?

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June 12, 2012
5:45 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
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Ghee is a type of clarified butter.

Clarified butter is a banner term for butter which has been rendered to separate the milk solids from the fat. Ghee is then cooked on slowly to darken and really purify the fat. That is the only distinction I can think of.

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
June 12, 2012
7:11 am
Jan's Sushi Bar
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Paul is 100% correct. Once you've melted butter and removed the water and milk solids, you have clarified butter. Ghee is slowly cooked over low heat until the milk solids are browned and the fat has a lovely nutty flavor.

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June 12, 2012
8:03 am
Lauren
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The longer cooking of ghee has to happen /before/ the fat is separated from the solids - it is the toasting of the solids that infuses the fats with the nutty flavour and more golden colour that ghee is known for. The longer cooking also condenses ghee more, making it firmer, longer-lasting and further intensifying the flavour compared to clarified butter. Frankly I just use clarified Kerrygold most of the time because making ghee makes a mess of my pots. But in some dishes you really do want the ghee taste.

Nice review, J. I'll flip through ISWF and see if I like it better than PB or TPS for curious newbies. So far I haven't found a book I can hand over and walk away.

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June 12, 2012
9:08 am
Angie
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I make ghee in my crockpot, letting it go until the milk solids are dark brown and it smells delicious. Then strain it. Not a mess.

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June 12, 2012
10:43 am
Otherworld
Guest

Angie, I never thought of making ghee in the crockpot...thanks for the tip! I, too, love the smell and nutty flavor that comes from the "toasting" of the solids.

Does anyone know the composition of the foam that rises to the top, versus the solids that sink to the bottom? I have heard that the solids are protein.

The review of ISWF is helpful. I have been thinking about trying it and this has inspired me to do so.

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June 12, 2012
2:44 pm
Charles
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Yes, Google "Ghee crockpot" and you'll get a lot of references. It's easy and works great.

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June 12, 2012
3:49 pm
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
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I cheat ... I buy mine:

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
June 26, 2012
6:06 am
Tim
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I'm on day ten of the whole 30 now. I have previously been 'paleo' for about two years but have still been carrying around about ten to fifteen extra lbs (I think, my small tire doesn't have a label saying how much it weighs). The only real differences between whole 30 and what I'd been doing were dairy and alcohol though my alcohol consumption is sporadic and more of a European pattern than an American one. That said... I've already lost several lbs and I do feel better. Maybe I really did need to ditch the dairy. I'll definitely stick it out to the end and in the future I'll likely be more careful about the dairy I do eat, but my absinthe collection must be properly cared for. On the whole I'd say the experience is already useful, even if I don't lose another ounce.

-Tim

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June 26, 2012
1:04 pm
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Anand:

Paul, Jan, and Lauren have it right.

Paul, Jan, Lauren:

Correct.  Interestingly, making ghee doesn't seem to do much damage to my saucepan...sure, I have to scrub it out afterward, but it's no worse than making chili.

Angie:

I've never tried to make that much ghee at once, but I bet it works great!

Otherworld:

The foam on the top is sugar, and the solids that sink to the bottom are protein.

Tim:

I'm glad you're finding useful information from your Whole 30!

JS

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July 1, 2012
11:39 am
Derek
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When will the Paleo/Primal community figure out that obtaining magnesium from food is better than magnesium citrate, or any other magnesium supplement? If the diet is superior, it should not need supplements.

Sprouted/fermented beans and buckwheat recipes are gluten free, provide a good source of magnesium, and contend with the oh so evil phytate.

The demonization of so many food groups by Primal/Paleo is over the top.

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July 1, 2012
4:25 pm
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Derek:

We know that already.

However, much of our dietary magnesium (and other minerals) used to come from the naturally occurring minerals in groundwater -- minerals that have been, for the most part, stripped out by modern water treatment plants.  ("The water's too hard.  It's clogging my showerhead and pipes, and my soap doesn't make enough suds.") 

Also, green leafy vegetables, from chard to basil to spinach to kale to seaweed, are excellent sources of magnesium.

See this article for why I don't blithely trust processed Neolithic foods, even if they contain reduced levels of the few known antinutrients and aren't obviously unhealthy.  Sure, WAPF-compliant beans and grains are better for you than the SAD...but they're still nutritionally inferior to meat, eggs, and veggies, and I see no reason to eat them unless you're too poor to afford real food or in denial about your bread addiction.

JS

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July 27, 2012
6:09 pm
Eva
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Derek, it may not be possible to get proper levels of all nutrients from foods from a grocery store. Most soils have been stripped of most of their nutrients. Farmers only add those back in that are required for growth which is only a few. Many things (really most if not all) in the store are also very hybridized, picked green, full of chemicals, etc. Not everyone can do all homegrown organic. Ever did some research on what has magnesium in it these days? You'd have to actually really pay attention to it every day to eat the recommended amount daily in natural foods. And that is assuming the USDA suggested amounts are not too low. Magnesium is one of those that is not super plentiful in many foods. Even most foods 'high' in magnesium are not really that high. Anyway, might not be wise to ready to point fingers. The paleo era is gone. We can try to approximate the general gist of it but we cannot get it back. Those food sources are no longer available and most of us are not eating brain matter, blood, and bone marrow daily either.

As for Whole30, since when are potatoes and tubers not paleo? We are adapted for starch digestion for a reason. Fruit is also paleo, although moderation is likely warranted. Does anyone really want to argue that ancient humans did not eat fruit and tubers? Not everyone on paleo needs to lose weight either.

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July 31, 2012
7:35 pm
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Eva:

The Whole 30 is very much an elimination diet -- the idea being that you can start reintroducing foods one at a time to see which ones cause problems for you.  And they're fine with sweet potatoes and fruit in moderation AFAIK.

JS

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February 12, 2013
6:17 pm
JayJay
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I'm doing a 30 day elimination. Meat, fats, vege, fruit. No potato, green beans or corn. (I grow those in my garden). My unstable blood sugar is fixed, lost a few KG, but i'm still not adjusted. Its not a problem, I have no new symptoms, Just don't have a lot a lot of energy, I still get hungry but not as ravenous and I don't sleep well, digestion is not so good. I wonder if I'm eating too low carb.

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February 15, 2013
12:50 am
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February 22, 2010
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JayJay:

You're not getting many carbs on a Whole 30: your only starch source is sweet potatoes (and, to a lesser extent, bananas).  

However: total up your calories for the day.  You might be surprised to find out how little you're eating, due to the lack of calorie-dense foods...especially since you've lost "several KG", which is over five pounds, very quickly.  

Result: lack of energy might just be due to not eating enough.

JS

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