Bookmark and Share

Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

  

— Match —

   

— Forum Options —

   

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
The Paleo Starter Kit, Part II: "The Paleo Scramble", A Basic Technique For Real-World Cooking
Read the original blog post
February 24, 2011
5:11 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

This is Part II of a multi-part series on real-world paleo cooking, for those of us with jobs and kids and commitments. Part I, "The Functional Paleo Kitchen", starts here, and my introduction to paleo, "Eat Like A Predator", is here.

Most recipes are useless for anyone who is employed, except as a treat on special occasions—and 'paleo' recipes are no exception.

That's because most recipes, between the shopping and the cooking, simply require too much of my time. And afterward I always end up with small portions of half-used herbs, fruits, vegetables, and juices slowly rotting in the refrigerator, plus a rack…

Bookmark and Share
April 6, 2011
12:55 am
Hot in the Kitchen |
Guest

[...] some good-quality curry paste and you can make some delicious meals very quickly (see the end of this article). Reply With Quote   + Reply to Thread « Previous Thread | [...]

Bookmark and Share
May 20, 2011
10:38 pm
eggs? | Mark's
Guest

[...] J Stanton's Paleo Scramble -- a quick, easy, nutritious meal. Reply With Quote   + Reply to Thread [...]

Bookmark and Share
June 7, 2011
3:44 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
Offline

" Got any hints for Indian curry spicing, yogurt or cream-based sauces, or anything else?"

Muglai Raan – Spiced Lamb

Take a large slab of lamb, mutton or goat – fatty is best :) Shoulder is a great cut, but leg will do.

Squeeze lemon juice (from real lemons, not a bottle) over it and let it sit for about an hour.

Make up a spice blend from the following powdered spices: chilli, cumin, turmeric and garam masala; basically even quantities of each.

Chop a few whole chillis, a few cloves of minced garlic, some coriander and a good squirt of tomato puree – stir into yoghurt along with the spices.

Quantities should be sufficient to cover the meat and spiciness "to taste".

Cover the meat both sides and leave overnight.

Next day … slow cook on a low heat for as long as possible. All day, if you can.

The meat should be so tender you can spoon it off … serve over boiled rice, with some vegetables or just wolf it down!

Hasina Kebab

Essentially the same process, but using golf ball sized chunks of lamb.

This is a faster cooking method, but the quick lemon juice bath and overnight sit in yoghurt will tenderise the meat.

To cook, put together on kebab skewers with thick slices of onion, green pepper, anything that will survive a BBQ … then BBQ them, or drop them into a tandoor :)

Both recipes should work with beef, bison or any grass-ruminator really.

Beef Stroganoff

Left over beef of any variety – cut into strips. Or cook up some fresh beef (steak), let it rest and then cut into slices.

Slice up some mushrooms (Chesnut mushrooms are my favourite) and shallow fry in butter, lard or fat rendered from your own meat cooking.

Chuck in the meat and when it's all tender pour in some cream … reduce the heat and let it all go a nice brown colour. Pep it up with a shot of smoky whisky if you like – Laphroaig is best :)

Stroganoff is often served with thick, flat pasta like Fettuccine stirred in, which you can do (as a "cheat") … or stir in some leafy green vegetables like spinach.

This is one that works perfectly with samphire (also called sea asparagus), but spinach, sea spinach or asparagus would do really well and will all cook in the time the cream is resting and colouring. You need a a good flavour punch of iron and salt to counter the cream with this one and those vegetables are sound. Brocolli would do well, too, even shredded savoy cabbage.

You can see – my recipes are principles, rather than 2 cups of this, one teaspoon of that … I just go with guidelines and taste.

Have fun …

Bookmark and Share
Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
June 7, 2011
7:34 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

Thanks, Paul!  

Those sound delicious: I'll try them once I can track down some garam masala.  Have you had any luck freezing the yogurt-based sauces, or do they go all funky when you reheat them?

Also, do you add any garlic, Worcestershire, mustard, or other spices to the stroganoff?

JS

Bookmark and Share
June 8, 2011
12:27 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
Offline

I've never frozen yoghurt – the sauces are easy enough to make up fresh. It may … but I don't think it would work. The spice mix can be pretty much whatever you like – the emphasis is upon colour, aromatics and depth hence the holy trinity of cumin, turmeric and coriander (which prefer as fresh and chopped although there is some in garam masala). You could easily just go with chilli powder, cumin, turmeric and coriander as powder. Another twist is to use fenugreek (also called methi) – fresh or dried leaves to add flavour, colour and aromatics instead of fresh coriander leaves.

Again, that's the great thing about currying meat – the mix can be tuned to your preference, but adding equal quantities of each spice is a good start. Boost one, lower another and add yet another if you like.

Over to the Stroganoff ... dairy products mute spiciness, evidenced by drinking milk if you've eaten a really hot chilli. Garlic would likely end up as an odd sharp background twang without the flavour. I leave it out, although the meat itself would most likely have been long cooked in onions and garlic anyway, so will have that subtle flavour within it. Mustard seems to work better at retaining its flavour and bite when it is within dairy sauces and I would recommend a small dot of yellow English mustard, rather than Dijon or a grain mustard.

Worcestershire Sauce is a flavour enhancer - this is great if you're using lean, bland meat or bland mushrooms, or trying desperately to pep up some non-meat lentil dish ... but we're using good flavoursome meat and flavoursome mushrooms. Dulling those naturally good flavours with something that is largely anchovy is not necessary. Feel free to try it - it won't curdle the cream.

Bookmark and Share
Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
June 9, 2011
7:17 pm
SJJ
Guest

Great post! I have a couple of Paleo cookbooks and you are so right about the lots of random things leftover after attempting a recipe (oddly, this seems to happen to me regardless of how I eat - when I ate bread, I would usually throw away a half a loaf every time because I could never get through the whole thing before it molded!). Anyway, I think it's silly for me to try to make things all the time from these recipe books because, well, I didn't do that when I was cooking non-Paleo style to begin with! I think the recipe thing may be more relevant once I have kids and I have to get creative to get them to eat Paleo with me. But when it's just me, this scramble thing makes perfect sense. I think that's about all I'll be doing from now on. I really enjoy cooking, but it's just not feasible to do the recipe thing every night. :-)

Bookmark and Share
June 9, 2011
11:56 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

SJJ:

I'm glad it works for you!  There are quite a few options between all the variants.  Don't sleep on the Chinese-spiced version, which I probably eat more than any other...and if you're OK with white rice on occasion, it's a delicious change from root starches.  Put the rice in after the onions or it tends to burn.

I may have to do the "meat and potatoes" post soon now that I've got the meat thermometer.

JS

Bookmark and Share
June 11, 2011
10:30 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
Offline

I should also add ... Ostrich meat is AMAZING curried!The Hasina Kebab recipe with chunks of ostrich would be fantastic!

I've found an "exotic meat" supplier about a mile from my house and just near one of my regular walking/sprint routes, so I can go and collect from them while out early evening. Is that hunting? Laugh

Bookmark and Share
Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
June 14, 2011
12:10 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

Paul:

It's pretty close if you walk home with an entire shank thrown over your shoulder.

JS

Bookmark and Share
June 15, 2011
1:32 pm
The Breakfast Myth,
Guest

[...] My paleo scramble recipe tastes great re-heated. [...]

Bookmark and Share
June 28, 2011
9:59 pm
ST
Guest

I just tried to make this and predictably since it was my first time cooking, it didn't turn out too well.

I tried following the recipe using the same vegetables (bell peppers and yellow onions), using this skillet (http://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-Nonstick-12-Inch-Covered-Omelette/dp/B002LSICYA/?tag=gnollsorg-20) you recommended. I ended up taking too long moving from step to step and everything ended up tasting overcooked. Next time I'll cut everything before I begin. Can you tell me how long you'd spend cooking each item before adding something else?

Also, how much butter should I use? I was using about 1/2 tbsp.

Bookmark and Share
June 29, 2011
4:12 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

ST:

First, a total of 1/2 tbsp butter (or coconut oil) is not nearly enough...that'll account for a lot of the overdone taste.  I use at least that much that just under the first layer of potatoes.  Then you'll need about that much again for the garlic and hamburger, and under the eggs.  "Non-stick" makes it easier to clean up, but food sitting on the bottom with no grease will still burn.

As far as times, I'll have to time myself next time I cook it.  

One thing you can try is to cook things separately.  Cook the potatoes completely (you can pick out a slice as they're cooking to test), and plate them.  Then cook the peppers and onions completely (same thing: test as they cook), and plate them.  Then do the hamburger and eggs, and once they're almost done, put the potatoes and veggies back in the skillet to heat them back up.  Use a stopwatch.  That should give you an idea of how long they need to take, and what they look like when they're done.  Once you've got the times down you can start doing them all at once like the recipe.

The garlic is what takes me the longest: it's always a pain to peel and mince fresh garlic.  If I have the annoying kind with tiny cloves I'll do that first, because otherwise it'll take too long.  And if I'm using rice instead of potatoes I'll do all the veggies beforehand, because the rice doesn't need to cook, it just needs to heat up and soak up some oil.

 

Note that you want the heat moderate: if the butter burns, it's too hot.  This isn't a stir-fry.

Also note that if the skillet isn't covered, the peppers and onions will never cook while they're sitting on top of the potatoes...you'll have to butter the rest of the pan and fry them directly.

 

Hope this helps!  Let me know how you make out.

JS

Bookmark and Share
July 1, 2011
6:21 pm
ST
Guest

Thanks for the reply.

I just tried making this again today and it came out much better this time. I did what you suggested and made everything separately, then put it all together at the end. I left out the eggs this time though because I didn't have any more.

The potatoes predictably took the longest, but they probably took longer than they needed to. I diced a potato into cubes and tried to cook that with about 1 tbsp of butter and it ended up taking 45 minutes for them to brown. Now I see the wisdom of using thin slices.

The vegetables and the beef didn't take nearly as long and took about ~15 minutes together. The only problem I had with the beef was that it was a bit chewy. I used diced beef tips from my supermarket.

Bookmark and Share
July 2, 2011
2:29 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

ST:

Yes, you just discovered the reason I slice the potatoes thinly.  If you find yourself slicing a lot of vegetables, it can be worth investing in a mandoline.  Warning: buy the Kevlar gloves with it if you're accident-prone, or you will slice the end off of at least one finger.

If the veggies and beef took 15 minutes to cook, I recommend turning the heat up.  It shouldn't take nearly that long.

If the beef tips came out chewy, try slicing them much more thinly.  Think Chinese food.  Usually I either use hamburger as per the recipe, or cook an entire roast separately and then put some pieces of it on top after I'm done.

JS

Bookmark and Share
August 14, 2011
11:13 am
Is diversity necessa
Guest

[...] in the twisted world of my psyche. I became convinced to start again after trying J. Stanton's Paleo Scramble and realizing that it was not only delicious, it was downright decadent. So my question is this. [...]

Bookmark and Share
September 14, 2011
9:29 pm
Robin
Guest

This is a lot like my cheeseburger omelet recipe that I've been living off for the last week. Just starting to get bored with it so it's good to have some variations to try.
For the cheese burger omelet I brown some ground beef or pork in butter with onion then add half a can of tomato paste, a dash of Italian seasoning and lots of garlic. Then I put that on a plate and cook the eggs in the same pan. I use three eggs with a quarter cup of cream and some paprika. I whip them up then pour into the pan and put the lid on. When the eggs are about half cooked I put the meat on one half of the omelet and grate some cheese on the other half and put the lid back on. When the eggs are finished cooking and the cheese is melted fold the two sides together and put it on a plate. Soooo yummy :)

Bookmark and Share
September 15, 2011
11:50 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

Robin:

Skillet cooking is the bomb: no mess, minor cleanup.  I'll have to tell my mother that recipe, as she loves omelets.  Thanks for the contribution!

JS

Bookmark and Share
December 6, 2011
11:36 pm
curry chicken recipe
Guest

Thank you for creating this website so easy to find info. good stuff. Saving this one for later.

Bookmark and Share
December 12, 2011
11:10 pm
Newbie questions aft
Guest

[...] like for now; once your tastes have shifted a bit, explore. Also, I really wish I had come across this recipe when I was starting out. I figured it out on my own after six months or so - but seriously, just [...]

Bookmark and Share
Forum Timezone: America/Los_Angeles

Most Users Ever Online: 86

Currently Online:
4 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 2456

Members: 3434

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 2

Topics: 247

Posts: 8433

Administrators: J. Stanton: 2105