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Does Meat Rot In Your Colon? No. What Does? Beans, Grains, and Vegetables!
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September 10, 2014
2:26 am
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Skgr:

I've been busy of late (hence the late replies) but I'll do my best to track down Conly 1992.
The butter oil research is detailed in Weston A. Price's "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration", available free online. There's published research on K2-MK4...follow some links from this article and this article. (Not to mention that it's a basic consequence of how K2 works...you can read the Wikipedia page for its role in calcium deposition. Basically, you need A and D to properly absorb calcium, and K2 to deposit it where it's needed.)

If you have a chart for meat vs. plant consumption in the Paleolithic, I'd be very interested in seeing its data sources! Stable isotope evidence can't tell us whether something ate meat or plants, just what sort of plants (C3 or C4) were at the bottom of the food chain...which tells us more about habitat than about diet. So we're, for the most part, dependent on things like estimated dates of salivary amylase gene duplication (from which we get the 120K-170KYa dates), divergence of human and leonine tapeworm DNA, greatly decreased rate of tooth decay previous to the Late Paleolithic, and direct fossil evidence (e.g. Dikika, Bouri and Gona, Schoningen).

While absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, the absence of evidence for plant consumption vs. the plentiful evidence for meat consumption from before the emergence of Homo to the late Paleolithic supports the idea that plant-based diets were very much a starvation-mode fallback, to which we did not begin to adapt until we had already reached anatomical modernity 200-100KYa. (And to which we have still not completely adapted: see this long discussion of salivary amylase copy number, in a reply to a different comment of yours.)

However, I'm open to new evidence either way, so feel free to point me towards anything you find.

JS

November 27, 2014
7:35 am
Ivana
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Amazing read! Simplified, and funny :)

I have a question - I've done the comprehensive stool test and the results say that fats and fatty acids are not broken down well in my body. i was initially pescaterian, and wash't doing well (no wonder after reading your article :), then when lab tests results showed that I am low on protein and fats, I switched to 'paleo' and was doing great at the beginning, but after a while i started feeling tired - maybe due to this fact, maybe some external factor. Now I've done this test, and my nutritionist is suggesting to introduce carbs (which made my stomach painful and bloated like NEVER before). So now I am thinking to go back to 'paleo', but using a supplement or smth to help digest those fatty acids and fats. Would you have any advice about that?
Also - my vitamin B reserves are extremely low, any reason for that after few months on wholesome, fresh, paleo diet?

Thank you sooo much!

December 12, 2014
5:46 pm
Sonia
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As a scientist, things like this make me feel like crying. You are twisting all the facts (some of them you just made them up) to try to prove something which is just false, I don't know why (is someone paying you?). Going to a therapist to try to solve your problems with vegetarians and vegans would help you too. They're just trying to do what they think it's right, why so much hate? They harm no one. You have a terrible ego problem and are shallow as very few human beings I have ever known. Please stop this bullshit, you're playing with gullible people's health.
You need to read some books. I don't even know where to start. First you have understood nothing about evolution. Second, rumians are not the only hervibores, and our ancestors were never carnivores, they were omnivores and mainly herbivores. Also you are mistaking rotting (which veggies don't do in your digestive system) with fermenting (which they do, though not in your stomach). And those are just like the simplest and dumbest things of all. I don't even want to start with your biochemistry. You need to study, you know? Referencing 4 or 5 papers doesn't make you an expert. We don't study for many years at college and then do a PhD and research for even more years to put up with this crap being called science. All this absurd credo you've made up makes me cringe.
Good luck with the gout! Also expect to have a life span like the one your ancestors had....

December 25, 2014
3:11 pm
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Ivana:

What "stool tests" are these? It's rare for fats to not be absorbed and end up in the stool, and usually if they do it's easy to tell: light, greasy stool and obvious fat floating around in the bowl. Usually the only people who have this problem have been low-fat veg*an for a long time, have had their gallbladder removed, or are eating a lot of Olestra! Have you found any such symptoms, or is it purely a test result you're concerned about?

That said, if fats give you trouble, you might try using coconut oil instead of butter or animal fat, as the MCTs are absorbed directly. (Caution: using too much coconut oil at once can cause TMI for some people.)

Moving on: if "carbs" make you feel painful and bloated, it seems likely that you have IBS, SIBO, or other bacterial overgrowth. In this case, the culprit isn't exactly "carbs"...it's "soluble fiber", otherwise known as complex sugars which your own enzymes can't digest but bacteria can. In that case, two things are often helpful:

1. Avoid foods with high "fermentation potential", e.g. lots of complex sugars. People react differently to different types, but typical offenders are grains (except for white rice), beans, onions, and other carb-heavy vegetables (with the exception of certain proteins). Norm Robillard's "Fast Tract Digestion: IBS" book offers the most complete overview of the problem and possible solutions.

2. Take a tablespoon of vinegar after each meal, as it helps control your bacterial population by killing many bad bacteria and promoting the growth of several good kinds. Most people prefer apple cider vinegar (commonly abbreviated as ACV) for the taste, but people with histamine intolerance should just use regular white vinegar. Remember to either dilute it or take a big drink of water right away, as vinegar (or any strong acid) doesn't play well with tooth enamel!

If your B12 reserves are still low, you might need sublingual B12. If that doesn't work, you may suffer low production of intrinsic factor and require periodic B12 shots -- but I'd try the sublingual first.

I wish you the best on your journey!

JS

December 3, 2017
8:10 pm
papopycatae
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December 15, 2017
6:30 pm
nutritionist
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I was on omnivore- ate tons of meat. I became sick, lethargic and almost went on disability because of autoimmune issues. Then I started something new- I went plant-based, eliminated the animal products which was giving me IBS. a few short years later, all of my health issues are gone. I have perfect digestion and eat mostly raw plant foods. Humans do not thrive on a meat-based diet. Never have. In fact most of the patients I see in the hospital eat meat-based diets and are dying from it. They have heart disease, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, etc. Still waiting for that vegan to show up in a hospital bed. Maybe one of these days. It's your death bed though.

February 1, 2018
8:45 am
Fim
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I wouldn't fart at all when I keep a strict bean diet(all grain, no meat, no sugars). Although it really feels toxic over time: aches all over my head, kidneys, and spine.

June 2, 2018
2:43 am
Roy
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People go on and on about how meat eaters are cruel, and by eating meat we are wrecking havoc on the plane. We need to make sausages out of insect meat and live on that. It takes 1.5 litres of water to raise a KG of insect meat. No animal or vegetable could top that. Simple that would get rid of the vege police forever. Annoying self righteous, people, with a religious fervor, on their favourite subject.

October 30, 2018
4:38 am
amie
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I experienced a severe bowel obstruction which had me hospitalised for 4 days. Cause put down to adhesions from multiple abdomenal ops over a life time. (am 68) but never caused trouble before. Luckily it cleared, so narrowly avoided surgery. Post op consult advised me not to eat more than a leaf or 2 of lettuce and slice of tomato per day. I had been eating large salads with lots of main culprit, celery, for 3 days including day of obstruction. But: consultant also told me a warning story of a patient who had a repeat hospitalisation after she ate a beef stew full of gristle. Aside from wondering how she swallowed the gristle as one surely tends to spit out these bits that can't be chewed, do you have a view whether gristle is included in the digestion process you describe for meat fat, and collagen?

October 30, 2018
4:39 am
amie
Guest

btw, grateful thanks to Zoe Harcombe for linking to this post in her newsletter about fibre.

November 8, 2018
8:17 pm
Lii
Guest

Really enjoyed this article.

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