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The Best Gravlax Recipe On The Internet
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April 5, 2012
2:19 pm
Zenia Peterson
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50 /50 Sea salt and Brown sugar ratio. Fresh dill is always a yummy inclusion.

24hr. curing time.

Foil-wrap fish on deepish-platter (to catch the liquid):

Weight: I use light-rocks to evenly press the fish down.

Refrigerate.

Flip at 12 hrs.

Re-Rock weight.

At 24 hrs. rinse and serve as you wish.

I love to get fresh baguette, generously schmeered with cream cheese, sprinkle with ridiculously thin slivers of lemon including rind, some more fresh dill and a blast of cracked black pepper. VOILA! Gone Yummy.

April 6, 2012
9:26 am
N. Lebo
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JS,

I just completed a 2nd attempt--this time using 3/4 cup fine kosher salt; 1/2 cup sugar lemon, lime zests; 4 grinds of freshly ground pepper; 1 and 1/2 TBS of lemon flavored vodka and followed your instructions. I used a brick and flipped the "sandwich" every 12 hrs and allowed the salmon to cure for approximately 38 hrs.

The gravlax is super! Not hard or crusty but soft and "buttery". The filets were rinsed in cold water and the initial tasting found the gravlax to impart a mild saltiness.
I am very pleased and delighted with the outcome.
Am planning to serve it as an appetizer with garnishes (capers, chopped red onions, thinly sliced lemon) as part of the Passover seder.
Happy Passover and Happy Easter!

April 6, 2012
9:50 pm
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Zenia:

Cream cheese is delicious.  Another variation is to pretend it's sushi and dip it in a little bit of tamari + wasabi.

N. Lebo:

I'm glad to hear of your success!  May I ask the approximate weight of the fish you used with the 3/4 cup salt and the 1/2 cup sugar?

L'Chaim!

JS

April 21, 2012
6:06 am
Danny Ehmann
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Ok, today is "D" Day. My 2 lb Salmon has been thawing in the fridge, and now I am ready to rock and roll.

I spent hours reviewing the internet. I was lucky to come across your site. In my experience, it seems the best ideas are simple.

I read all the information you provided, including the comments,
top to bottom several times.

I even have a Zester tool in my Camp Kitchen drawer, didn't even
know what the heck it was...till now.

I am going to follow your method to the "T"

May as well use my Vacuum Sealer, while I am at it.

Will let you know the outcome in about 36 hours.

Thanks for your intuitive information!

Danny

April 23, 2012
4:00 pm
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Danny:

36 hours is doable, but 48 hours is recommended for best results.

I hope it works for you...I just served it to a bunch of people this weekend, with excellent results.  Even the teenagers loved it!

JS

April 26, 2012
6:23 am
Danny Ehmann
Guest

Howdy here from Texas.

Just to be on the safe side, I waited 3 days-about 72 hours.

Since I did 2Lbs 1oz of Salmon I used the 2.25 ingredient conversion table, and zested 3/4 lime...for weight of the Salmon.

Since you mentioned the fresh Dill amount did not have to be precise, I had 3/4 oz on hand, minced stems and all.

My wife bought 2 fillets, one I hot smoked with my special recipe. When I went to grab the second one later, it happen to be skinless Chile Farm raised. Darn It! Decided to proceed anyways.

In the final step, I vacuumed sealed the sandwich. Most likely I did not need to turn them every 12 hours, I did anyways, just in case gravity had an effect.

After all this work (actually it was fun) I was anxious on the
results.

I went head and drained off the juices, scraped off the most of the Dill, went ahead and rinsed, patted dry with paper towels (it was easier to remove some more of the dill, still leaving some flakes for presence).

Results....Man was I surprised! The texture, flavor (had a nice
Dill flavor presence also) awesome.

Along with the cutting samples...(Sushi), we ate it traditionally with my home made Bagels, Red onion (purple color), and cream cheese. My friend who dislikes Sushi,(so he tells me)helped himself to a second sandwich.

Next time I will make sure the skin is on the fillet, and hope to get Wild Salmon. If you have any other suggestions, I am open, other than that we are very pleased. Thank you for all your experiments. Been there with many recipes.

Chow.

April 27, 2012
12:57 am
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Danny:

I'm glad you and your family enjoyed it!  (Even teenagers and people who "don't like raw fish" usually do.)  One of the reasons this recipe works so well is that curing time isn't critical: as you discovered, it's fine to leave it for three days instead of two.

My only refinement (which I've added to the recipe) is to use more salt and sugar on the thick end of the filet, and less on the thin end, for a more even cure.  Other than that, you can experiment with adding more salt or sugar to taste: some people like their gravlax saltier. I wouldn't use less salt or sugar, though, as the fish probably won't cure completely.

Enjoy your gravlax...and if you have any favorite recipes you'd like to share, please do!

JS

May 29, 2012
10:57 am
Erica
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Thank you for sharing this detailed set of instructions for making gravlax. I made it last week, and it was awesome! I was pleasantly surprised because I fall into the kitchen klutz category.

May 30, 2012
2:08 pm
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Erica:

Most of being a "kitchen klutz" is not knowing all the tips, tricks, and details of cooking that most recipes simply assume you're already familiar with.  I decided to take the guesswork out by illustrating each step.

I'm glad it worked for you!  

JS

May 30, 2012
2:19 pm
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Halifax, UK
Gnoll
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The great thing about paleo/predator eating in general is, you simply cook some meat your want to eat with some veggies that you want to eat. Flounce up to your heart's content thereafter.

With this gravadlax recipe, it is a process, it does take time and it does require care, but it is a method which is relatively easy to follow and does not require precise timing. Remember, this is a method which was used by Scandinavians with much less kitchen equipment than any of us can really comprehend to quite simply preserve a glut of fish.

Living in the Ice Age
http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk

June 13, 2012
3:49 pm
E. Reich
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I just made a batch using your recipe, but the salmon's been frozen for the last week and I didn't completely thaw them before seasoning and wrapping the pieces. is that a problem and is there a way to fix that?

June 13, 2012
3:56 pm
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Halifax, UK
Gnoll
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I doubt it - the "cooking" effect of the salt will still have got right in there. It will have thawed through the process and the excess water fully released. Perhaps lay some weights on top of the fish? Place a tray on top and something heavy to press out any potential excess water.

Living in the Ice Age
http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk

June 13, 2012
9:24 pm
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E. Reich:

Just let it cure an extra day or so to make sure it's completely thawed.  It'll be fine.

(That won't work with most recipes, but it'll work fine with this one!)

JS

June 21, 2012
3:46 am
Pete
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Hi,

Gravlax is my all time favourite starter, by Dad is a chef and used to do it for me all the time! The bit that made his incredible was he used to do a mackeral pate/paste with it. Blitzed mackeral, with a bit of horseradish, lemon, salt pepper and splash or worcester sauce. Try it, it completes the dish for me! Doing this for a dinner party next week, doing a "come dine with me" with friends! Wish me luck!

June 23, 2012
12:30 pm
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Pete:

I'm sure it'll be delicious!  If you're serving it the traditional way (on toast, with a pungent sauce), you can add some more salt to the cure to give it a more traditional taste.

JS

June 23, 2012
2:47 pm
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Gnoll
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How did it turn out, Pete? Good? I hope so.

The great thing about this process is, really delicate fish can be cured; likewise, strong flavours can be amplified. It's a simple, but good process.

New house, now, bigger fridge ... time to make another one.

Living in the Ice Age
http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk

June 26, 2012
9:32 am
Carl
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Finally got around to using lemons and it tasted about the same as it did with the limes...and just as delicious.

I only use sockeye and it comes out great every time.

Does anybody else have a slight taste of tea in their gravlax?

June 26, 2012
12:47 pm
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Carl:

Perhaps the lemon makes it taste more tea-like?  Or perhaps it's something about the fish...wild fish varies in taste much more than farmed fish.

JS

August 5, 2012
7:25 pm
HobbyHorseman
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Now that much of the fresh salmon sold is farm raised, and colored, and not as firm, I follow your excellent recipe but use a wooden board (cedar) and a five pound flat brick, put that on top of the gravlax in the fridge and it presses the moisture out. I take the fish out when it does not leak anymore.. 2, sometimes 4 days.

August 17, 2012
1:58 pm
AnthonyC
Guest

Hi,

I am a keen fly fisherman from the UK, I tend to go to places with larger rainbow trout (6-30 lbs). My biggest problem has always been what to do with the fish I catch, now I have the perfect answer.

I made 2kg (4 sides) using your recipe and it came out fantastically well. I am now fighting off the friends and family for the next batch!

Also freezing the fish and then fully thawing them prior to starting the curing process seems to work better than starting the curing process on fresh "just caught" fish.

Many thanks

AnthonyC

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