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What Is Hunger, and Why Are We Hungry? J. Stanton’s AHS 2012 Presentation, Including Slides
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May 13, 2014
9:49 am
Dave
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Thanks, J. I'm seeing this as a feedback loop between diet and the condition of facial musculature (posture). As a child I suffered some ear, nose, and throat problems, more so than my siblings. I also had crooked teeth. During my mid teens some teeth were removed and I had braces. My siblings did not have this problem. Dr. Mew states in his presentations that teeth do not remain straightened, and this has been my experience over the past 20+ years. The underlying problem of maxillary development was never properly addressed.

However, having cleaned up my diet over two years ago, I no longer have frequent sinus, throat, and ear problems. I'm now trying to follow Dr. Mew's recommendations: Teeth together, lips together, tongue on the roof of the mouth. I never realized how little space for my tongue exists on my palate until I began putting his advice into practice. I'm considering this my own personal n=1 to see how things develop over the next few years. As Dr. Mew said in a 21 Convention presentation: "I know I look better now than I did ten years ago."

Thanks for the reminder about "novelty" and the search for "the next big thing." Still, I suppose there's no harm in trying out something "new," and there are those who may discover some benefits from things like resistant starch. Personally, I've found out that there's only so much starch that I actually want to eat, and then I just don't want any more. The other day I deep fried French fries in some beef tallow I had rendered out previously in the slow cooker. They turned out great. But I didn't binge on them. It's certainly not something I would do every day, either.

I guess that's one of the benefits of becoming fat adapted and regaining my metabolic flexibility. I can eat some starch, but it doesn't induce insatiable cravings for more starch. I don't have to depend on "willpower" to stop eating. I'm looking forward to your next presentation. You'll let us know when it goes online...

May 25, 2014
1:30 pm
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Dave:

I absolutely encourage experimentation!  

However, it's important to journal carefully and remain skeptical, as confirmation bias is extremely powerful and it's easy to convince ourselves of just about anything.

See: Fan death.

And yes, metabolic flexibility is absolutely fundamental.  Without it the starch and sugar cravings will continue, glycemic control will remain poor, and you're still on the slow but steady road towards T2D. even if you're skinny.

JS

June 20, 2014
7:15 am
oxide from Mark'
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I know I'm late to the commenting party. What about a graph for exercise? Practically every stupid commenter for nutrition articles on news sites (like CNN) says that we got obese because, you know, "you piggies starting stuffing junk food into your faces instead of playing outside, especially you rotten kids who play computer games." Can you look for a data chart for exercise to see if there's an inflection point in 1980?

Also, instead of mere hunger, what about the finger-food factor? At least for me, oreos and candy and potato chips are attractive because they are CLEAN -- not crumbly or greasy -- pre-prepared little packets of food you can pop in your mouth by hand on the go. No need for forks or dishes or napkins like messy steak and cooked veggies.

June 23, 2014
4:18 am
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oxide:

Unfortunately for the "sloth and gluttony" hypothesis, years of data clearly show that children get fat before they stop exercising, not the other way around -- strongly suggesting that lack of exercise is a consequence of obesity, not a cause. Furthermore, I have found no data to suggest exercise decreased in 1980, and quite a bit of suggestive evidence to the contrary (the late 1970s and 1980s were the peak of the running boom).

I believe the "finger-food factor" primarily results from two factors, both of which I discussed in the presentation. First, availability. All you have to do in order to snack is open the bag, whereas real food usually involves cooking and cleanup, and perhaps a trip to the store: therefore, you don't have to want snack food nearly as much as real food in order to eat it! Second, snack foods are generally devoid of complete protein, which I also address above (see "protein targeting").

Again, I strongly believe this is the best framework we currently have to understand hunger and appetite, because it explains our real-world experiences so well!

JS

June 24, 2014
7:22 am
Dave
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I have to agree with the "finger food" factor. Real food requires preparation and clean-up. Right now I'm getting a bit hungry for breakfast, so I'll have to fry some ham and eggs pretty soon. Back in the day it would have been the cue to grab some cookies, ice cream, or Hot Pockets for convenience sake. It's so easy to do if you've got that kind of stuff in the house. So, I just don't buy it in the store anymore. As a result I often "suffer" from a bit of mild hunger before I get my lazy self in the kitchen to make some real food. :)

June 27, 2014
1:43 pm
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Dave:

Yes.

Stated in terms of the presentation: foods with high availability require less incentive salience to consume them, and therefore require more willpower to avoid consuming them.

Foods with low availability require higher incentive salience to consume them, and therefore require less willpower to avoid consuming them.

JS

July 27, 2014
5:11 pm
VibeRadiant
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This might be a silly question, but seeing the subject is why we are hungry, what better place to ask.

I have been following a lchf diet for nearly a year with some backsliding into eating more carbs and sometimes those processed carbage gluten-free foodstuffs to get me through a craving for the real stuff.

I rededicated myself to following the food plan of paleo/primal/GF/keto/lchf or whatever you want to call it, I find that even after eating to satiation, I get hungry 2-4 hours afterwards. I know there are no grains, gluten, sugar, or other stuff in it because I made it myself and didn't add these to my meal.

My portion sizes are larger then some I've seen and they say they go 6-8 hours without needing to eat again on the paltry amount they eat.

Help?

July 28, 2014
2:46 pm
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Vibe:

You may need to compare the calorie content of your paleo food to what you were eating before: Paleo foods tend to be much more satiating despite containing less energy, so you might just be eating a lot less!

However, it's also very likely that you need to work on your metabolic flexibility, particularly since you mention carb cravings. This is where exercise comes in: not to "burn calories" or "lose weight", but to improve your met flex! Read my 2013 AHS presentation for more detail.

Finally, a small spoonful of fat can help you get through fasts. MCT oil in particular can give a nice little energy boost without tossing you out of the fasting state...and consumption is generally self-limiting because it 1. tastes like nothing and 2. often causes TMI if you consume too much.

I wish you the best!

JS

July 28, 2014
4:28 pm
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Thank you J. I'll read that post.

December 15, 2014
6:01 am
WalterB
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RE: MCT oil

Better have some Betatine HCL as MCT oil is likely to induce sever digestive tract upsets including loose stools at the most inconvenient times, as can coconut oil and any of it's derivatives. Indeed for me, a high fat meal of any kind can do that for me.

I don't think that is to much information as to the result of MCT oil etcetera, people need to know the results rather than finding out by experience, one can ruin a few sets of pant if one doesn't know what is likely to happen and the results.

December 25, 2014
2:00 am
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WalterB:

Most people have to consume a lot more than a spoonful of MCT oil before experiencing diarrhea, but I take your point. How does Betaine HCL help with that?

JS

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