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For curiosity's sake:
October 11, 2011
2:56 pm
Portland, OR
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 16
Member Since:
October 7, 2011
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By what time after starting eating paleo is it reasonable to expect the
body to make adjustments and start burning stored fat for energy? What
might I expect to experience and how can I maximize the effectiveness of
this practice?

 

Thanks!

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October 12, 2011
1:20 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
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The shift will happen almost immediately. For me, I was feeling quite awesome within the week ... and I ate a very good diet of real food before. Dropping out the grains, beans and pulses was the winning formula; I retained dairy intake.

Many people do suffer some problems in the first few days - headaches, lack of focus, nausea, tiredness, chills and even ravenous hunger. This will depend on where you start from and are all related to coming off your previous diet.

Your body resets and very quickly, you'll be on your way to a long, fulfilling and truly healthy life.

Fat loss, if that is you goal, will happen quite naturally thereafter - it's excess carbohydrate which makes you fat. The fat balance from paleo foods is good to go without weighing or measuring - just eat and enjoy. Couple the dietary change with moderate activity and you'll feel fantastic!

Jump in ... do it for four weeks, do it as pure as you can for that period and see if you want to continue.

It's not a religion - it's your life. Feel free to eat off trail occasionally.

Good luck ...

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
October 12, 2011
11:54 am
Currently: Northeast US
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 32
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July 7, 2011
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Well said, Paul.

Yes, the changes can be pretty instantaneous, as if the body had been overreached on the cellular level all that time and at long last finally got what it needed - leading to a massive supercompensation response (which, funny enough, takes about one week to manifest after significant homeostatic disruption).

My own experience was tremendous.  Literally after only about a week plus did I notice that not only was my physique becoming leaner and MUCH stronger, but something changed behind my eyes - my outlook improved, my "hunt drive" (if you will) shot through the roof... I began to think like an Alpha.  It was a welcome change indeed.

As long as one maintains some resonable degree of (fun, thus consistent) activity, the body, being smarter than we are, will do what it needs to do automatically.  Eat the right things until you're full, rest, then go spend all that energy however you see fit.

With each bite you take, new predator, the world of possibilities opens up more and more.  Now go take what's yours and devour it.

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In the spirit of the hunt, Rob
October 12, 2011
2:16 pm
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
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You've led me into some of the things I was going to say initally, but thought it might be too much information, initially.

I think that feeling of being very real, very true to the human frame is because of a true release from modern life and modern living, into natural homeostasis. I'm glad you said the words ... "homeostatic distruption". Break free and become real. J calls this "Live in Freedom ... Live in Beauty" and it is absolutely the core of paleo living.

Yes, living ...

Paleo is much more than a diet - as I said above, it's about your life.

Live ... eat ... play ... sleep ... love.

What we ingest, how and when we ingest it is core to our being. We must eat. Eating right is half of the battle won against a modern world which would have us dietary slaves to the corporation who define our meals by what they can make the most profit on.

Now that we don't do much activity as a species, we need to invent ways of exercising. Again, follow the money - gyms, essentially. I don't do that - I walk in the evenings, whatever the weather, whatever the conditions over the beautiful landscape I live in ... and use that time to de-stress from a conventional 9-5 job. I get so much more out of my evenings by doing that.

I don't mind my 9-5 job - I work for England's NHS (National Health Service) and see that as very much an altruistic job, one which benefits everyone ... whatever the discussion around that might be. If I didn't spend my working hours doing that, I'd work for my own ends ... which is different to "working for yourself".

From this growing discussion, I hope brynnsweet can see how paleo eating ("Predator eating", as J and many of us here would refine it) leads to a change in lifestyle; a change in outlook. Yes, we devour! Yes, we savour! Savouring can mean taking the time to enjoy a sunset and can mean concentrating on intense hunger between meals over a skipped, or missed, meal.

For guys, that sense of realising the alpha male within us is truly liberating. For women, it is equally important.

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
October 12, 2011
9:17 pm
Currently: Northeast US
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 32
Member Since:
July 7, 2011
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"For women, it is equally important."

Agreed.

Gnolls are matriarchal, after all.

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In the spirit of the hunt, Rob
October 13, 2011
12:17 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
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February 22, 2010
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brynnsweet:

Here's a typical progression I've seen and/or experienced.

1. 2-7 days of what I call "wheat withdrawal".  Whether it's the low-carb flu, a lack of gluten exorphins, gut flora adaptation, and/or just not being able to eat many of your favorite foods, it usually takes a few days to adjust to a higher-fat, lower-carb diet.

The adjustment is often made easier if you have some quick and dirty recipes to start with.

2. After the withdrawal period, you'll start feeling the positive effects.  I actually recommend going lower-carb than you might otherwise during this time (no more than 15-20% of calories, even if you're physically active) in order to kick-start the adaptation process. 

After some time you'll notice that hunger isn't running your life like it used to.  Don't push it...but ask yourself "Am I actually hungry, or am I just in the habit of eating at this time of day?"  You'll know you've turned the corner when you can do fasted workouts, and about then you'll realize that hunger is sharpening your perceptions and abilities -- not just making you distracted.

3. Problems often slowly start resolving themselves over the next weeks and months (or even right away, for the fortunate).  Allergies, itches, rashes, irritations, GI distress, GERD, PCOS, etc.  You'll also notice how shitty cheating makes you feel -- and that you always felt like that before, you just defined it as "normal".  And desserts aren't nearly as big a deal as pizza...which will make you feel like crap.  Trust me on this.

4. You'll know you're on the next level when you spontaneously fast for 24 hours because you're just not that hungry...I mean, you could eat, but it's too much trouble right now, so why not just wait until morning?

You can kick-start the process by eating lots of nutrient-rich eggs, particularly the yolks, beef liver 1-2x/week, fatty fish 1-2x/week, and also by following the supplement recommendations of the Jaminets' Perfect Health Diet.  One-A-Day brand vitamins (or the generic version) actually cover most of the bases except for magnesium (you want malate, or citrate if you can handle it), iodine, and K2-MK4.

Hope this helps!  Keep us posted.

Rob:

So true.  It's humbling to realize: "This is what being human is SUPPOSED to feel like."

And yes, gnolls are matriarchal: but I don't know of any predators where the females sit at home while the males hunt.  Lionesses actually do most of the hunting, while the males usually just wait around and steal it.  None of the other predator cats are stay-at-home moms, and neither are female wolves.

Paul:

Well said.  I don't have anything to add.

JS

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October 14, 2011
10:37 pm
Portland, OR
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 16
Member Since:
October 7, 2011
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First thing's first: thank you all for the informative and encouraging responses.  Please bear with me as I am not well with words.  I'm more of a visual person, I think in pictures and not phrases :D

I suppose a good place to start is how much I hated 'dieting'.  I never once found anything that I could stick to and feel good on.  I never had any energy and was always hungry, which was hard because I need supreme concentration and lots of energy to do what I do for a living.  I either felt like I was starving, or I was in a food coma.  There was never balance, and I would just give up.  And I've been shuffling around for years like this!

And then I started making changes in my life.  I recently opened up my own business, I'm moving into my own home (soon!), and have finally started to figure out what I need as an individual (something I have never really done).  After talking to a close and most-trusted friend, I started to change the way I eat.  The difference I have felt has beenoverwhelming, and I started not even a week ago.  Today in particular, I felt (for the first time I can remember) so much energy it felt like I was going to burst!  If i wasn't at work at the time I would've sprinted around outside – I wanted to chase and play!  I don't remember a time in my adult life that I've ever felt so alive.  

Another thing that blows my mind about this way of eating (and really, should there be any other way?) is that I've always LOVED these meals.  I've been a carnivore ever since I was a little girl, and steak has always been my favorite food.  So, the fact that I can eat what I've always loved eating and feel this great is mind-blowing.  My being is morphing; I've never felt so excited about such (potentially intimidating) change.  All of this is absolutely wonderful.  I'm so, so happy and grateful that I found a place to come and share, document, and be informed and engaged.  I need encouragement, and I am stoked that I found a place I can turn! 

 

So, thank you all.  I hope to be a good addition to these forums! 

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October 15, 2011
2:20 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
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Awesome! You're on your way ...

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
October 15, 2011
12:57 pm
Currently: Northeast US
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 32
Member Since:
July 7, 2011
Offline

This is encouraging and exciting.  Good for you, Brynnsweet!

I know that here is the place to be for others of our pack to share info, encouragement and ideas.  Glad to have you around, and I'm glad to be here myself.

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In the spirit of the hunt, Rob
October 16, 2011
10:33 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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brynnsweet:

We're glad you're here!

"Today in particular, I felt (for the first time I can remember) so much energy it
felt like I was going to burst!  If i wasn't at work at the time I
would've sprinted around outside – I wanted to chase and play!  I don't
remember a time in my adult life that I've ever felt so alive."

As I said: this is what being human is supposed to feel like.  It is natural to be happy, healthy, and vital.  It is unnatural to be fat, sick, and depressed.  We're not discovering a new state of being, we're reclaiming our heritage.

JS

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October 16, 2011
1:02 pm
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
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Taking it all back ...

Bountiful energy, great health and a feeling of wellbeing is normal. I smile more when I eat paleo, too.

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
November 1, 2011
8:03 pm
SF Bay Area
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 11
Member Since:
September 6, 2011
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Hey all!  Long time, no talk.

 

Which, is fine.  I went on a cross country trip.  No job?  No worries, eh?

 

I
came back to my copy of the Gnoll Creedo, which, I'll admit, I tore
through, because it was fantastic!  I'm so happy I was able to come home
to it.

 

I'll admit, I cried at the end.  No, not at the predictable place, but at the VERY end.

 

Thanks for writing it!

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Canis Crocuta Dirus The Dire Hyenawolf.
November 2, 2011
2:19 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
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June 5, 2011
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PDW - I trust you were baring your teeth and snarling at the predicatable point?

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
November 2, 2011
7:07 pm
SF Bay Area
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 11
Member Since:
September 6, 2011
Offline

And whooping with laughter every so often.

 

Occassionally wondering how stupid the human could be that he couldn't have SEEN IT before she told him.

 

It now lives with me in my bag...  I hear a rumour about T-shirts? 

 

I've got a Gnoll in the works.  And I had to laugh about Aiden's inability to find a chest height Gnoll terrifying.  Because, that's what I'll be!  I'm only 5'2" but I've been told that I'm imposing and terrifying in my own right.  Even at my height and 250 lbs!  WTF?

 

I kind of want to do haouka because there's simply not enough scary where I would be costuming.

 

I already have two suits, a porcupine, and a bat, so, we'll see!

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Canis Crocuta Dirus The Dire Hyenawolf.
November 3, 2011
2:03 am
First-Eater
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Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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PDW:

Welcome back. The ending is bittersweet, is it not?  We have a monumental task ahead of us…but there is hope as long as we do not abandon it.

Writing TGC was an incredibly intense experience.  I cried like a baby in several places, and Gryka caused me more than one spit-take with her blunt responses.  I'm glad I was able to communicate some of that to you.

Welcome home.

JS

PS: "Occassionally wondering how stupid the human could be that he couldn't have SEEN IT before she told him."  Seen what?

Also, I'll be interested to see what your gnoll looks like…though I haven't looked very hard, I admit I haven't been impressed by anything I've seen so far.

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November 3, 2011
9:54 am
SF Bay Area
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 11
Member Since:
September 6, 2011
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Thanks for the warm welcome, J.

 

RE to the PS:  Every so often there were things that she would cover that he wouldn't understand, that even the barest scrape of an Animal Person KNOWS.  It's just Things We Know.  It was strange how he couldn't See IT.  IT.  Everything.  From the concept she was talking about, to the ones she hadn't yet covered.  It's like he was standing at a presipice, and instead of seeing it for what it was, he would simply say "it's too dark"  of COURSE it's dark! 

 

Sometimes the things I say don't make any sense either...

 

I'm going to be actually building my Gnoll after I shed some weight.  The less fur I have to buy, the happier I will be.  At the moment, I need roughly six yards to make a full suit. (That's for someone 5'2" and size 44 pants)  I already know the colors I'm using, I just need to design the fur pattern, and find a proper fur for the face.  The problem with the one I'm going to use is that it's a fantastic and warm tan long, but once you shave it down it turns solid brown.  That'll look good in some spots, but not the look for the face that I want.  Or, I may just ask someone who's done Gnolls before to do it.  Course, that can get expensive...  Over twelve hundred for the artist I want...and I don't have a job at the moment!  Ha!

 

To the drawing board, I suppose.  I've also got an anthro hyena in the works.  Though, she's already well designed.

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Canis Crocuta Dirus The Dire Hyenawolf.
November 27, 2011
1:42 pm
Portland, OR
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 16
Member Since:
October 7, 2011
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Ahh, it's been a little bit.  Figured I'd check in and give some updates on my "diet" journey.

 

This transition into winter has been hard on me, to make the right choice instead of the easy one, in terms of what I'm putting in my body.  I also moved at the end of October (unfortunately, I realized I moved away from my favorite deli) and that's where I really broke my stride, and went for what was easy and cheap, instead of...well, what was right.  A week of eating like I used to eat, and oh.my.god.  I felt horribly "normal" again...that tired, sluggish feeling that no amount of coffee, or even a nice long walk, could disperse the fog from my body and head.  

If anything, it was a truly remarkable learning experience.  You eat like this; you feel alive.  You eat this stuff; you don't want to get out of bed.  That's not living, or being productive, or healthy!  I truly understand now:

"This is what being human is SUPPOSED to feel like."  Feeling human is much more enjoyable.

On this side of Thanksgiving (which was delicious, and I hope everyone had a great feast), I just need to breathe, take a step back and be more concious of what I'm buying and cooking and eating.  

Oh!  Also!  I'm about halfway through the Credo and I couldn't feel more inspired from that, if nothing else.  Excited to finish it, and venture into some discussions about that as well.  Thank you again, J.  I'm sorry about all that hassle.  I keep having a nagging feeling that two books are going to just show up randomly...then I'd have three copies!  Oof.  

Until next time!

Brynn

 

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November 27, 2011
2:05 pm
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
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Stick at it! If you've ventured from the path, well ... that's paleo, in times of lean, "needs must" as we say up here in northern England. Find your feet and find the gold.

Enjoy the rest of TGC ... there's a quickening of pace in the second half of the book, but do and don't get carried away with the pace. Go with it, get carried along, but savour each second.

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
November 27, 2011
2:08 pm
Portland, OR
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 16
Member Since:
October 7, 2011
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I'm usually a very, very fast reader, so I have noticed myself missing things and I've been working on slowing my reading stride down, for maximum absorption and ultimate retention :D

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November 30, 2011
4:28 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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Brynn:

It's absolutely true that eating conventional grain-based food makes us feel cranky and sluggish.  I realize now that I felt like that my entire life -- I just defined it as "normal".

You'll continue to experience positive changes over time.  I'm still undergoing mental and physical transformation from eating like a predator, and it's been nearly a year since I fully committed.

JS

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