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No Teeth
February 3, 2012
9:32 pm
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 19
Member Since:
June 26, 2011
Offline

Hi

 

Wonder how people coped that were eating this way when they lost their teeth.  Meat would have been difficult.

 

Regards

ubetido

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February 4, 2012
2:20 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
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I get the impression that dental decay did not come about until grain became introduced during the mesolithic. Eating real food like meat and chewing fibrous plants to extract the goodness would be very good for teeth, strengthening them.

Ground down grain lingering around in the mouth led to the introduction of early decay.

True, if teeth were lost through trauma then this would be problematic for the person, but they'd still be able to chew with the molars even if tearing front teeth were gone.

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
February 5, 2012
5:18 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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Paleolithic people had uniformly excellent teeth: archaeology shows that tooth decay is extremely rare before the Neolithic.  Read Weston A. Price's "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration" for many examples, including agricultural societies whose nutrition and dietary practice was sufficient to prevent caries.

There are most likely several factors influencing this:

1. For many thousands of years, grain was ground with stones.  That means there was a lot of sand and stone chips in the grain, which caused tooth wear.

2. The nutrient that allows us to grow strong teeth, and even regrow lost dentin (vitamin K2-MK4) is only present in the organ meats and bone marrow of animals (or in unpasteurized, grass-fed dairy fat).

3. As Paul pointed out, chewing tough, fibrous meat and plants during childhood causes teeth to become stronger.  Eating grain-based gruel (and drinking beer) doesn't.

4. Mouth bacteria feed on sugar and starch.  A diet high in simple sugars and starches encourages tooth decay.

JS

PS: ubetido, I'm glad you're asking questions -- but the volume is becoming difficult to deal with, and answering you is taking a meaningful amount of my time and energy.  I'd greatly appreciate it if you reciprocated by buying a copy of The Gnoll Credo.  (If you have no interest in reading it, just pass it on to someone who might.)  Thank you!

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February 8, 2012
6:09 am
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 19
Member Since:
June 26, 2011
Offline

Hi JS

Happy to contribute via donation.

Do you have a paypal account

You can email me if you like.

I do appreciate the responses.

That is great country that i saw some pics of.

 

Regards

ubetido

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February 13, 2012
4:04 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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ubetido:

I don't like having a "Donate" button because it puts a price on my advice, as well as implying fee for service.  Just pick up a copy of TGC through whatever retailer is convenient for you. 

If you're in the USA, I encourage you to get a signed copy from my publisher (though Amazon and B&N also work).  Here's a list of places that ship for free to the rest of the world: The Book Depository is reliable.  Worst case: you can donate it to your local library if you don't like it.

Do stick around!  I'm glad you're posting to the forums, instead of peppering me with emails, so that others can get the benefit of the exchange.

JS

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February 14, 2012
1:52 am
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 19
Member Since:
June 26, 2011
Offline

Hi JS

 

I can respect what you are saying although i have a different view. 

 

IMO a donate button doesn't take away the free information.  But it does cost to run a site and you have indicated it takes time.

 

The donation is for providing the site. The interested  meet in one place and exchange views. The option donate at least is there.

 

or make it downloadable.

I am in Australia is there a  digital copy that can be downloaded perhaps. in PDF.

 

Regards

Ubetido

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August 21, 2012
6:07 pm
George
Guest

Having lost all but a  few lower teeth before coming to paleo (and saving the rest) I can testify that all cooked meat and veges is easy to chew without teeth. So is cheese.

Fire and cooking  are way paleo.

 

Raw carrots,  apples, and cabbage are impossible to eat. But who cares?

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August 27, 2012
3:10 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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George:

I'm glad you're still able to eat with some facility...though I plan on keeping my teeth as long as I can!

Interestingly, cleanings seem to be much less painful for me since "going Paleo".  I have no explanation for this.

JS

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August 27, 2012
3:19 pm
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
Member Since:
June 5, 2011
Offline

Since going paleo, I fancy my teeth are growing even more (sorry, George) ... I have all my teeth, all but one wisdom tooth. The other three have all poked through even more over the last few months, and what I thought was some swelling on one tooth has come through with a nice spike. The other two are also pushing a little.

Back to cooking for folks with less teeth. Steaming is one sure fire way of keeping in as much goodness in the food while removing all of the problem of chewing. Better still, reserve the steaming liquor to pep up with some bouillon or meat stock and make a good, wholesome soup.

One superb recipe goes like this ...

Take some meat, any meat, and stew it with whatever flavours you like for ages. Best get cheap, fatty meat. Stew is for a good few hours until it has really broken down.

Next, trim a cauliflower and steam it. Crush it, once steamed - this is your "rice". Ladle over some meat and you have a meat (whatever) and rice. If it's spicy, try adding some pureed avocado to the cauli for a kind of green rice.

Have fun ...

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