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Thanks for waiting for me.
December 6, 2013
12:51 pm
Houston, TX
Immigrant
Forum Posts: 8
Member Since:
December 6, 2013
Offline

Just finished TGC. Changed my life. Thanks to Neosavage for the recommendation.

I am 30 years old, worked in corporate IT for 7 years and am ready to get out of my cage. Planning to move into a more meaningful profession, real work - like construction - to make a living while I create things. TGC gives me courage.

Went paleo in 2012. Been obsessed with primal fitness since then.

It is great to be part of the pack. Please reply, tell me about you.

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December 8, 2013
6:45 pm
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
Offline

pgraham:

I'm glad Gryka's story spoke to you.

There aren't very many gnolls -- but there don't need to be.

Welcome home.

JS

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December 20, 2013
10:39 am
american midwest
Immigrant
Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
December 20, 2013
Offline

hello, brother.  i know what you mean.  escaping the cage is important.

 

construction sounds nice.  what kind?

 

i've just joined the community, myself.  you can learn about me here.

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December 31, 2013
12:02 pm
Houston, TX
Immigrant
Forum Posts: 8
Member Since:
December 6, 2013
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whistler said:

construction sounds nice.  what kind?

 

carpentry and homebuilding. building things seems like more fun than fixing computers even though it is more work for less money. does that make me naive?

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January 2, 2014
12:02 am
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2105
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
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pgraham:

Carpentry is a good start because you can accumulate some skills on the side while you're still making money elsewhere.

Here are a few more related ideas for skilled craftsmanship:

If you want solid money, learn to build good custom sofas/loveseats/ottomans/padded furniture.  There are about a million woodworkers wanting to make gorgeous wooden stuff and only so much demand for it...but there are a lot fewer people willing to make usable everyday furniture, and you'd be surprised how much even the cheapest mass-produced junk costs (go shopping for one sometime), let alone something solidly made...and custom sofas can easily cost over $10K!

Upholstering isn't even that hard once you learn to sew, which isn't too bad either...and if you've got a machine that can do upholstery, you can make and repair all sorts of outdoor equipment.  In my town, the one seamstress with the capabilities to fix and alter outdoor gear (softshells, hardshells, backpacks, etc.) gets more business than she can handle!  So that's another avenue to look at.

Whatever you do, if you get into heavy construction, don't get bamboozled into hanging drywall.  It's the worst job that pays the least.

JS

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