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Foolproof Prime Rib! How To Buy, Cut, And Cook A Standing Rib Roast: The Easiest Prime Rib Recipe On The Internet
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March 7, 2012
8:15 am
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Prime rib is an intimidating entree to cook for many of us, because the meat itself costs so much. It's easy to have over $75 worth of meat in the oven—at which point mistakes become extremely expensive.

Fear not! Here's how to buy, cut, and cook a prime rib roast that comes out perfectly every time. Not only is this recipe easier than most because I omit needless steps—it produces a tastier roast than most restaurants.

How To Buy A "Prime Rib Roast"

"Prime rib" is actually a colloquial name: the proper name is a "standing rib roast", because not all rib roasts…

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March 7, 2012
8:54 am
Jan's Sushi Bar
Guest

I also have a very easy prime rib recipe - not too terribly different from yours. You just preheat the oven to 450F and roast the meat for 20 minutes to brown it. Then let it rest in the oven with the door open for 5 minutes and roast it at 200F until it reaches the desired internal temp (and yes, DO use an oven-proof meat thermometer; my oven comes with one that plugs in to the range and will turn the oven off once the meat reaches the correct internal temperature).

We buy our beef from a local farmer - entirely grass-fed, of course - and have it processed at a local abattoir. We had the pleasure of being allowed to watch our last side of beef be cut into it's component parts a few weeks ago. I took many photos and am in the process of cleaning and cropping them; as soon as that's completed I'm going to do a post about the process.

We did not get a standing rib roast this time, instead opting for 6-week dry-aged rib eye steaks. Tomorrow I'm posting, complete with a lovely photo, of how we turned the ground beef from the trimmings into the most delicious steak tartare we've ever eaten.

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March 7, 2012
8:59 am
eddie watts
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next time i shop i am looking for prime rib.
suspect it is not called that here in uk, or maybe i've just never noticed it.

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March 7, 2012
9:06 am
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
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June 5, 2011
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It'll still be "rib". Here's a guide to the difference between US, UK and Dutch cuts: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beef#Cuts

Congratulations on the AHS gig, J!

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Living in the Ice Age http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk
March 7, 2012
9:20 am
Neal Matheson
Guest

I think they have that cut in waitrose as "rib something". Might be this sundays meal

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March 7, 2012
12:09 pm
Bodhi
Guest

Thanks for making me really hungry and full of food envy. On a different note, will you be at the Paleofx? I saw your name on version 3 of the schedule but it wasn't on version 5. I'll be there and thought it would be cool to get my "The Gnoll Credo" book signed.

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March 7, 2012
12:11 pm
tess
Guest

we find that it's easiest, when we choose our roast at the butcher's, to ask that he cut off the bones and TIE THEM BACK ON. it's the best of both worlds -- adds "bone flavor," but makes it easier to carve when cooked. ;-) LO-O-O-O-VE me my prime rib....

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March 7, 2012
4:30 pm
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Jan:

I hope the oven-proof thermometer was implied by the recipe...but I'll probably add a clarification that the "instant-read" type isn't what you want.

Can you even age beef for six weeks?  Most dry-aged beef is done for perhaps three weeks...ours went for four, and it was getting pretty pungent by that point.

I love steak tartare!  Seasonings are nice -- but raw ground beef and egg yolks will do by themselves in a pinch.

eddie:

I suspect it's still called a standing rib roast, and the steaks are called rib steaks.  Let me know if you find out otherwise!

Paul:

I'm proud and excited to be speaking -- and I'm sure the talks will eventually be available on Vimeo.  Hopefully they'll be able to integrate the slides with the video this year.

Neal:

Absolutely -- so long as you get an accurate meat thermometer first.  That's the key.  The difference between "quite rare" and "medium rare" is only 15 degrees, and many cheap dial thermometers aren't that precise.  (If you see a rack of them at the store, look at where the needles sit...often there'll be a spread of over ten degrees in the readings!)

Bodhi:

Unfortunately I won't be at PaleoFX.  Between presenting at ORD Camp in January and AHS in August, my time and energy for conference travel and presentations has been allocated.

I'll be there with you in spirit, though...especially if you wear your "Die Biting The Throat" T-shirt :)

tess:

That's a good idea...but how does he tie it in a way that keeps the bones attached?  If I tied a rib roast the obvious way, the bones would just slide right out.

JS

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March 7, 2012
6:16 pm
daniel
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roast rules. keep writing, js. i abandoned most of my other blogs bc of too much repetition and not enough "usable" information. as always, even your simple short posts provide something for me to work with.

peace!

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March 7, 2012
7:11 pm
Bodhi
Guest

You can bet I'll be sporting my "Die Biting The Throat" T-shirt at PaleoFX. I'll post some pics of it on my blog.

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March 8, 2012
4:56 am
Chuckie B.
Guest

I actually used to work at a prime rib restaurant started by workers from the house of prime rib, and what we'd do is pack the prime rib in rock salt. Actually, maybe I'll talk to the owner, because that was by far the best prime rib I've ever eaten.

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March 8, 2012
12:24 pm
tess
Guest

J –

the bones are cut off together, so there's meat between, then he just ties strings tightly between the bones, parallel to them. cut the strings when the meat is ready to carve, and the slices can be nice and neat. later, after the guests leave, you get to chew the meat off the bones. ;-)

btw, i wore my DBTT t-shirt when flying to SF the other day — caught a LOT of people reading my chest!

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March 8, 2012
4:28 pm
First-Eater
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daniel:

gnolls.org is all about information density. 

Bodhi:

Excellent!  Say hello to the Jaminets for me.

Chuckie B:

Salt is a reasonably good tenderizer.  Do you know how long they cooked for, and at what heat?

tess:

OK, I get it.  You're basically getting some extra short ribs to eat afterward.  I usually grill mine, but I bet that's delicious too.

The shirts definitely draw attention!  They also make me step up my game: I can't be a shlub wearing something that says "Die Biting The Throat".

JS

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March 8, 2012
7:45 pm
mike
Guest

outstanding ! Ive been learning to cook the last few years and this is as good as instruction gets. I would try to get the meat to room Temp before putting in the oven, but with an internal thermometer you should still get an accurate reading on the temp. And please kosher the meat with kosher salt 30 mins before putting it in the oven. Seat salt is a finishing salt to use after it is cooked. Kosher salt is made to prepare meats for cooking. Enjoy the ribs folks. I'll be over at six.

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March 9, 2012
1:07 am
Chuckie B.
Guest

No, but I'll give the guy a call tomorrow. Hopefully he'll be in. But what they'd do is take the whole bone in roast and use two long enough pans that were each a bit deeper than half of the rib...come to think of it, it MIT have even been a specialized, hinged pan, anyway, the whole thing was packed with rock salt, cooked in a big industrial...pizza? Oven, then dug out with a shovel...freakin' delicious.
Man, with the AHS was being held somewhere near us this year :(

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March 9, 2012
2:01 am
First-Eater
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mike:

Koshering is really only necessary to kill bacteria when you're letting the meat sit out at room temperature, and when you're using high temperatures that put a "crust" on the meat -- in which case it indeed works very well.  That being said, though I haven't been impressed with the herbal crusts I've tried, I might experiment with a salt crust next time.

Remember, you're not preheating the oven, so it takes a while to come up to 275 degrees.  This lets the meat come slowly up to temperature.

Chuckie:

That's hardcore!  And that's a lot of rock salt.  I bet the heat diffusion from being encased in salt allowed them to cook at a higher temperature...let me know what you find out.

The AHS is all the way across the country for me -- but last year it was perhaps a day's drive, so that's fair.  I wonder if it'll be in the Midwest next year, or if it'll continue to be bicoastal?

JS

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March 9, 2012
4:45 pm
mike
Guest

Koshing the meat does not produce a salt crust but pulls out moisture to help with cooking it evenly. Koshing salt is long and flat unlike table salt which is a small grain or sea salt which is a large grain, the flat kosher salt does not seep into the meat like the grain salts do. For a salt crust use about two or three pounds of sea salt to cover it all, then after cooking, smack it with a mallet and release the crust- it will not taste over salted despite its appearance.

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March 10, 2012
6:57 am
Chuckie B.
Guest

Oh, and hey, J. You might want to consider getting a vacuum sealer...especially at grass fed beef prices. Really extends the freeze/refrigerate/shelf life of things. I'd recommend one with canisters, it's really cool to have leftovers last two to three weeks in the fridge...not to mention having your beef last as much as a year in the freezer!

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March 10, 2012
3:47 pm
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February 22, 2010
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mike:

2-3 pounds?  Wow.  I'll try it -- but it seems like a lot of work.

Chuckie:

I buy all my grass-fed beef vacuum sealed from the slaughterhouse, for exactly the reasons you state: it lasts over a year in the freezer, versus perhaps six months for wrapped.

I've looked at buying one before, but they all seem to be very expensive...and frankly, if I have leftovers for 2-3 weeks, I'm doing it wrong!  Then again, I live within a couple miles of two supermarkets, so I buy fresh vegetables every few days and don't have to worry much about preservation.

JS

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March 10, 2012
3:55 pm
Halifax, UK
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 365
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June 5, 2011
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... a vacuum sealer is really useful for the sous vide method - cooking at the lowest temperature necessary to cook it without discolouring it or losing any flavour. Like raw, but cooked.

Ghetto sous vide cookers can be made form old homebrew beer equipment or a coolbox with a thermo-controlled heater element.

If you've got vac packed meat, try out the sous vide method - in simplicity, boil some water and pour out into a pan, leave it 10 minutes, pop the meat in, lid on and leave it on the lowest heat possible for a couple of hours.

Is wrapping in plastic paleo? BPA and all that? Pfff ... predators are made of stronger stuff than that.

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