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Foolproof Prime Rib! How To Buy, Cut, And Cook A Standing Rib Roast: The Easiest Prime Rib Recipe On The Internet
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March 13, 2012
2:52 am
Neal Matheson
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Tried it on sunday, outstanding!

March 15, 2012
8:37 pm
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Paul:

Meat all comes in plastic whether you know it or not, unless you're buying from a butcher who hangs his own meat.

To my knowledge, the problem with xenoestrogens leaching from plastic is greatly exacerbated by hot fat (they're fat-soluble)...so I try to avoid heating meat (or other fatty leftovers) in plastic containers.  And I always rinse and dry my meat before cooking.  So I'm a bit suspicious of sous-vide...but as I haven't looked into the issue in great detail, I'm not willing to make any definitive pronouncements.

Neal:

I'm glad the recipe worked for you!  I'm all about "simple yet delicious".

JS

April 6, 2012
10:23 pm
Lesley
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A couple of years ago, I cooked a standing rib roast in salt. It turned out spectacular!

Rock Salt Roast Prime Rib
Ingredients:
1 (4 pound) prime rib roast
2 cups prepared hot mustard
4 cups rock salt
1 cup cream
2 tablespoons prepared horseradish

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Line a roasting pan with aluminum foil.
2. Liberally coat the roast with mustard, so that it is entirely covered. Put a thick layer of rock salt on the foil in the roasting pan, about the size of the bottom of the roast. Set the bottom of the roast on the salt, and press down to embed the salt into the mustard. Completely cover the remainder of the roast with rock salt, pressing it into the mustard. (A lot of salt will fall off into the pan, but that doesn't hurt anything).
3. Bake uncovered, in preheated oven for 60 minutes, or until internal temperature reaches 145 degrees F (65 degrees C). Let stand 15 minutes. The roast will be encased in a 'shell'. Hit the shell sharply with the back of a knife, and it will crack open and start to fall off. Remove the shell, and place the roast on a cutting board. Slice, and serve with horseradish sauce.
4. Horseradish sauce: In a small bowl, whip the cream until stiff peaks form. Fold in horseradish to taste.

April 6, 2012
10:43 pm
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Lesley:

Thanks for the recipe!  It seems like the salt's function is to absorb the heat so that the roast cooks more evenly (and doesn't form a crust) when cooked at such a high temperature.

And yes, creamed horseradish is delicious!

JS

December 8, 2012
10:33 am
Katherine
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Between steps 10 and 11 one step that links us to our primitive ancestors is missing: safeguarding the slab of meat from packs of predators, in my case also known as "housepets".

December 9, 2012
4:32 am
Indiana
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We have an elderly cat that is a bengal (they're vocal, very primative in their nature (headbutting is huge to them etc)) and perpetually hungry.

 

Generally our salt-peppered meat is guarded heavily in the kitchen.  But that day my back was turned and my husband was out preparing the grill...

 

I hear a noise. I turn.

 

Elderly cat has nabbed a New York strip steak and is running off with it!

 

I notice. My husband hears my scream and we both utter something Beavis and Butthead-like similar to "No WAY asshole!" and wrest the steak away from the cat.

 

Who proceeds to Bengal-yowl for around 3 minutes because he lost his prize. He got a pity-piece of it though once it was cooked.

December 17, 2012
3:12 am
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Katherine, E Craig:

Good point. Our family lost a few hamburgers to our dog back in the day.

JS

February 12, 2013
12:10 am
JayJay
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Is the crust the bit that goes crunchy, thats my favourite bit. Yummy

February 12, 2013
2:19 pm
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JayJay:

Crunchy is difficult: dry, hard, and leathery is the usual outcome (in my experience) when prime rib develops a crust.  I find that grilling at high temperature is the only way to reliably get that "crunch", at which point you've cooked something other than prime rib.

JS

November 28, 2013
8:23 pm
Dan
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I followed this recipe exactly and it came out FANTASTIC! The whole family love it. Thank you very much!

December 2, 2013
1:28 am
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Dan:

Glad to hear it!  Thank you for letting me know.

JS

December 15, 2013
12:01 am
samc
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People should buy Prime Rib boneless for sure, that way I can buy up all the beef back ribs in the freezer at the store.

Hands down best beef I've made is Sous Vide. Take tough cuts and turn them perfectly tender and take tender cuts and keep them that way. Haven't tried Prime Rib yet, but the back ribs & short ribs are perfect.

December 17, 2013
12:18 am
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samc:

I haven't tried sous vide yet, as it requires some relatively expensive equipment that I don't own!

JS

December 24, 2013
4:42 pm
Anne
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I have a tiny little bone in roast - only 2.5 lbs. I follow your logic here, and will put in a cold oven at 275, but do you have any guesses how long it will be till I really need to watch it / measure the temp? Hard to figure out dinner plans otherwise. Thanks! great info! happy christmas to you!

December 24, 2013
8:58 pm
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Anne:

A four-pound roast takes about two hours to cook to 115F (in my kitchen and oven), so a 2.5# roast will probably take 60-90 minutes to reach the same temperature.  (And not much longer to reach 130F...temps rise rapidly once the center begins to get warm.)

I advise doing your first check (and butter/oil basting) a bit earlier with such a small roast, perhaps around 45 minutes, and I'd start watching it fairly closely not long afterward.

JS

December 25, 2013
7:30 am
Anne
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thanks - have a great holiday! appreciate your time -

December 28, 2013
5:17 pm
Leslie
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this was totally perfect!! Had a 4 rib "size" boneless rib roast, cut it in half...and this was perfect - even the crusty sides were rare!! thanks!

December 29, 2013
3:37 pm
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Leslie:

You're welcome!  I'm glad to hear of your success.

JS

December 16, 2018
6:42 pm
Tim Vacca
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Thank you

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