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The Best Gravlax Recipe On The Internet
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October 27, 2014
7:34 pm
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Tonessa:

Vashe zdorovye! I'm glad that you've found it as delicious as I do. And $5/pound is a steal...congratulations!

JS

November 6, 2014
7:43 am
MotherSquid
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Greetings From Sunny Florida- I have this 'in the bag' for eating this weekend, but since I'm making 3# for 2 people, (1) I'm wondering how to store this, and (2) how long it keeps....We are going the bagel with cream cheese, red onion, tomato & caper route, & it may take a week to eat it all. Thanks for sharing!

November 8, 2014
2:19 am
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MotherSquid:

In my experience, it's usually good for at least five days -- though it's only at its freshest for the first two or three. Salmon has a very distinct odor when it starts to go bad, so if it smells wrong, don't eat it!

JS

November 10, 2014
10:17 am
Fred Taber
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Trying this recipe right now with a 1.1 lb Atlantic salmon fillet. I used your numbers as posted. 2 tsp of salt ( I used natural all purpose sea salt it's not course) 2 tbsp of sugar. (I only have natural cane sugar) and the dill and lime. I double wrapped it in clear wrap then vacuum sealed it with my foodsaver. I will let you know how it comes out. I have never done this before. ALSO... can this be done with Brown Torut? I wanted to try it with that but figured I would try it with the salmon first.
Fred

November 13, 2014
11:59 am
Fred T
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Ok.... it was as described.... buttery! YUM! However..... not ever doing this before we were all kind of concerned about whether or not it was truly done and if we would get ill. Sooooo we smoked it with apple wood for 2hrs. The result..... some of the BEST smoked fish we have made so far. And that's saying a lot. We then used it in a homemade smoked salmon dip which again was the BEST! Certainly using this method to smoke the next batch of brown trout next weekend.
We have all had smoked lox before but being the first time making it and never having homemade before it was a little scary eating it even though it was delicious!
Fred

November 13, 2014
1:38 pm
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Fred

I was just writing a reply when your update came in. Others have also reported that smoking the cured fish is delicious: I'm glad you agree!

Again, you always eat raw fish at your own risk...but I've made this recipe dozens of times and fed dozens more, I'm sure that many thousands of filets have been cured worldwide using this recipe, and I haven't yet had any reports of anyone becoming ill. So I'm reasonably confident in it. I do, however, know that I wouldn't use any less salt and sugar than the recipe calls for: the fish just comes out raw if you do that.

No, I've never tried it with brown trout! In general, I'm leery of raw freshwater fish due to parasite issues, but if you're smoking it also, I suspect you'll be OK. Thanks for sharing!

JS

November 17, 2014
8:54 am
Mika
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I have been making gravad lox for the last 25 years. It was shown to me by my friend Ingrid from Sweden.Three observations on the above recipe
1. The salmon should always be Sushi grate Scottish or from Norway or even from Chile as they are of the same family. Atlantic will not do.
2. You must pile dill BEFORE you put the mixture of salt and white pepper and pile dill again to touch the second filet
3. The knife that is shown in the picture for slicing is totally the opposite kind of knife. You need a special knife. It has a thin and flexible blade

November 18, 2014
11:02 am
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Mika:

1. I've made many batches of gravlax using Atlantic salmon. While I absolutely agree that wild salmon from Alaska, Chile, or anywhere else is indeed better, Atlantic salmon is still delicious...and even steelhead is quite tasty! I'd rather not discourage my readers from trying this recipe just because they either can't afford or don't have access to fish that can easily cost US$20/pound these days.

2. Your own recipe clearly differs from mine in several respects. I'm always interested in learning how others make gravlax...so if the recipe you use is online anywhere, or if you care to share it, please do!

3. A special flexible slicing knife would indeed be best, but I don't have one! Fortunately, the cure firms the fish up enough that I seem to do fine with a regular chef's knife.

JS

November 28, 2014
9:14 am
Shelaki
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I have made this recipe many times and it is always amazing!! Easy and impressive. I am so addicted and would eat it everyday if I could. I am growing dill in my winter hoop house - just so I can make this recipe! Love it
Thank you so much

November 29, 2014
7:17 pm
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Shelaki:

You're quite welcome! I always advise people to make more than they think they should, because it has a way of disappearing! And I love having fresh dill around the house, too: I just wish it didn't go to seed so quickly. Thanks for sharing.

JS

November 30, 2014
6:23 pm
dmitry
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Thank you for the recipe! I find that with Costco farmed salmon I need to add a bit more salt: keeping the same amount of sugar and adding more salt to bring to ratio of sugar to salt closer to 3:1 instead of 4:1. May have something to do with fat content?
Also, the more dill the better :-) I use it on both sides of fillets.

December 22, 2014
4:39 pm
Fran
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i screwed up and mixed the salt, lime, dill and sugar in one bowl and went ahead and put it on the salmon. Is that ok? orshould i scrape it and start over?????

December 22, 2014
6:06 pm
Emma A
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I'm trying this out for Christmas. Unfortunately, the stores near me are all of dill. I assume dried dill isn't worth bothering with. Will this still taste ok with just salt and sugar and lime zest? Any suggestions for other additions?

December 23, 2014
5:08 am
Mike Kindell
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Wows, this stuff is good! It is such a straightforward recipe and thank you for sharing it with us. I made it and we wiped that out so quickly that my 13 year old son and 11 year old daughter made it again; on their own. They did great with your recipe. One thing we do differently is splash a bit of liquid smoke on the fillets after drying them and before putting on the dill and salt/sugar.

Thanks again!

December 25, 2014
1:25 am
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Fran:

Don't worry about it. The lime might leave some little white burns on the fish, but it'll taste fine.

dmitry:

The flesh of farmed salmon is usually more watery than wild salmon, so if you find it perfect for wild salmon, it doesn't surprise me that you like the farmed stuff with a bit more salt.

Emma A:

It'll cure just fine without fresh dill, but it won't taste the same. At that point you might try making the traditional dill/mustard sauce, for which you can probably use dried dill, and eating it with the sauce.

Mike:

The liquid smoke is a popular addition. I'm glad you and your family enjoy the recipe, and I'm glad your kids know how to make it now too. You're welcome!

JS

December 28, 2014
12:55 am
Penley
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I used your recipe and was originally a bit worried about the levels of salt and sugar but it worked perfectly - I will never go back to using so much salt as I've used with previous recipes. The curing worked perfectly - no 'raw' bits, all done to perfection, but the lower levels of salt and sugar meant that the actual flavour of the salmon came through so much better. We had it for Christmas as an entree with a goose for main and it went down a treat. Mum's going to try this recipe as well. Thank you so much for sharing.

January 1, 2015
7:40 am
Lena
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Hello,

This may sound like an absurd question, but can another type of fish be used got this recipe since I live in Africa these days and good quality salmon is not always easy to find here?

January 2, 2015
12:54 pm
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Penley:

You're welcome! I'm glad I've been able to make your family's holiday season just a little bit happier.

Lena:

If the fish is safe to eat raw or undercooked, it should be safe to cure in this way...though I can't vouch for how it'll taste. Please let us know the results of any experiments you try!

JS

December 21, 2017
6:33 pm
Michele
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Hello, I’ve made this recipe 3 times in the last 3 years with Atlantic Salmon, it’s excellent and I can’t thank you enough for doing all the research! Last time my husband cold smoked one side after curing and it was also really delicious, and a nice way to serve with the two different flavours.

December 21, 2017
10:49 pm
Anna
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This is the third year in a row that I’ve made this for Christmas lunch. We’ve had it at Easter’s too. It works perfectly every, single time!

Thank you for your recipe. My family loves it.

Anna
Melbourne Australia

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