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"Eat Like A Predator, Not Like Prey": Paleo In Six Easy Steps, A Motivational Guide
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June 18, 2012
3:21 pm
jamal
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i think you can only get coconut oil for massaging or use it on hair not for cooking.
also can u link a website that sells coconut oil for cooking.

June 19, 2012
9:08 am
jamal
Guest

i can get this coconut oil from the local supermarket this is the link for coconut oil that i am talking about

KTC Coconut Oil

is this what you me recommend to eat also is this for cooking??

[Yes, that's fine. I recommend buying it in tubs instead of bottles, though, because coconut oil solidifies at 74F and you'll have to microwave it or melt it under warm water every time you want to use it. -JS]

June 20, 2012
9:19 am
Liz
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Hey J,

Awesome article. I completely agree with everything you said here because it's simply right on the money. I'm a Type 1 diabetic (insulin dependent for over 20 years), and quickly noticed the downward spiral I kept seeing and feeling by the addition of excess grains/carbs/anything in "ose" in my diet. I still have a few tweaks to get out of my diet, and I'm excited about following this new lifestyle. Have you seen positive results from Type 1's on Paleo? I'd love to hear.
Thanks again!!

June 20, 2012
2:52 pm
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Beate:

Grains and grain products (seed oils) are cheap, but they're not the diet we evolved to eat.  I wish you the best of success: let us know how it works for you.

jamal:

Yes, you can increase muscle mass on paleo…but as paleo foods are very satiating, you might have to force yourself to eat more food than you normally do!  

If you're really trying hard to build muscle mass, you can break the "don't drink calories" rules and drink things like protein shakes and smoothies (scoop of protein powder + 100ml coconut cream + some fruit + enough water to make it liquid = delicious mass gainer shake).

 

Re: coconut oil, all the kinds you linked will work.  In fact, I haven't yet seen a pure coconut oil for sale that isn't food-grade, and therefore edible!  Note that unless you're buying a gallon at a time, it's generally cheaper to buy it at the supermarket…in the USA, even Wal-Mart carries it now.

Also note the difference between refined coconut oil (has no taste, suitable for use in any recipe that calls for regular cooking oil) and unrefined/"virgin"/"extra virgin" coconut oil (which tastes like coconuts).  I generally cook with refined oil: if I want the coconut taste, I'll just buy cans of coconut cream and make my curry with those.

Finally, I'd buy it in tubs instead of bottles if I could, because coconut oil solidifies at 74F, and you'll have to microwave the bottle or melt it under warm water every time you want to use some.  If you get it in a tub, you can just scoop it out with a spoon.

JS

June 20, 2012
3:21 pm
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Liz:

A lot of Type I diabetics seem to do very well on Paleo: Steve Cooksey's Diabetes Warrior is full of information specific to diabetes.

I find it bizarre that the mainstream advice in response to a disease of impaired glucose metabolism is "Eat lots more glucose!  Then shoot insulin/take pills to minimize the damage."  That's a great way to maximize profits for drug manufacturers and the medical industry...at the expense of your life and health.

Of course, your health is your own responsibility (see my disclaimer on the left sidebar): that being said, I think you'll find that eating like a predator can help you stay healthy and keep your blood sugar under control.  Keep us posted.

JS

June 23, 2012
3:41 am
john
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4. A high fat diet doesn’t leave room for enough protein or carbohydrates
High fat diets are often promoted as effective ways of increasing anabolic
hormones and controlling fat storing hormones, resulting in increased muscle mass and
decreased body fat. The problem with this approach is that eating large quantities of fat
doesn’t allow enough room within your daily calorie allotment for a sufficient quantity of
protein or carbohydrate. Any diet that leans excessively towards one macronutrient is not
a balanced diet and will never produce optimal results.
5. Saturated fats reduce insulin sensitivity
Insulin sensitivity refers to the responsiveness of your muscles to insulin. Insulin
carries the sugar into the muscles for energy and glycogen storage. It also carries the
amino acids into the muscles for growth and repair. When you have poor insulin
sensitivity, it’s like insulin is standing outside with protein and carbs, knocking on the
muscle cell’s door, but the muscle cell won’t let the insulin bring the carbs or protein
(aminos) inside. So blood sugar continues to build up, and you release even more insulin
to try to get the nutrients into the cells. Not only are the high insulin levels disastrous to
your fat loss efforts, severe insulin sensitivity is essentially an early stage of diabetes.
6. Dietary fat gets stored more easily as fat than any other nutrient
Dietary fats DO get stored as body fat more readily than other types of
macronutrients. This isn’t just due to the high calories, it’s because the process of
converting dietary fat into body fat is chemically very easy. Body fat is made of glycerol
and fatty acids. Dietary fat is made of glycerol and fatty acids. There’s no costly energy
conversion that has to take place. This makes dietary fat very easy to store. Too much of
anything gets stored as fat, but foods such as lean proteins and complex carbohydrates
must go thorough a metabolically costly process to be converted into body fat.

June 23, 2012
3:52 am
john
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the above article states why high fat diet is not good.

June 23, 2012
2:44 pm
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Gnoll
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Aw, shucks ... I guess all those thousands of generations of humans prior to the invention of (or rather, the invention of the process of extracting) poly-unsaturated fats must have felt just awful.

Living in the Ice Age
http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk

June 23, 2012
5:18 pm
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john:

"A high fat diet doesn’t leave room for enough protein or carbohydrates"

First, this isn't a high-fat diet!  This is a "don't throw away the fat that naturally occurs in food" diet.  Note that I don't recommend drinking milk (or any other liquid calories), nor do I recommend dumping butter or coconut oil on things in order to meet some magical macronutrient ratio.

Let's do some math.  20% of protein calories at 2400 kcal/day ends up being about 1.5 g/kg for an 80kg person, which is plenty unless you're on a serious bulking program...and then you'll be eating a lot more than 2400 kcal/day.  

Then, if you're on a bulking program, you won't be able to use more than 15-20% of energy from carbs, since cardio is counterproductive to bulking...meaning you've still got 60-65% of your energy needs to account for -- from fat.  If you're not bulking, you won't need more carbs than that unless you're doing lots of glycogen-depleting exercise...at which point your energy needs will also increase from 2400 kcal.  

Looks fine to me!

"Saturated fats reduce insulin sensitivity"

Actually, no, they don't.  This is another bunk myth that gets repeated over and over, despite being false.  Here's a review of the relevant literature.  

"Dietary fat gets stored more easily as fat than any other nutrient"

It's also burned for energy preferentially to any other nutrient -- healthy people at rest are burning roughly 90% fat and only 10% glucose.  Eating carbohydrate stops this process, due to the action of insulin and other hormones -- since high blood sugar is toxic, your body immediately switches to sugar-burning in order to keep your blood sugar down.  

Furthermore, since high blood sugar is toxic while high blood fat is not (within reason), your body will clear the excess glucose more quickly, converting it into fat when necessary.  In contrast, blood fat is cleared more slowly, allowing your body to burn it instead of storing it.

The unintuitive consequence: a high-carb diet actually raises your triglycerides (i.e. fat in your blood), whereas a high-fat diet lowers it.  This is well-established and noncontroversial.

JS

June 24, 2012
4:43 am
john
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to be honest i am confused myself reading your article and the one above.

i have no idea which one to follow

June 24, 2012
1:49 pm
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Gnoll
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Follow this ...

If it comes in packaging, don't eat it.

If it comes with an ingredient list longer than the description, don't eat it.

If it comes with a label that gives any kind of warning, don't eat it.

If it is real food - ingredients, as in a thing you can make a meal from, eat it!

Eat meat, fish, shellfish, eggs and veggies. If it's dry, add animal or coconut fat. Beyond that, forget everything else and ... enjoy J's tagline.

Living in the Ice Age
http://livingintheiceage.pjgh.co.uk

June 24, 2012
1:53 pm
mike
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hi J. what is your opinion on eating raw meat?

June 25, 2012
1:24 pm
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john:

It's easy to experiment, because you're not committing to a years' membership in advance.  Try eating like a predator for a few months and find out for yourself what it's like!

Paul:

I'd add "root starches, and occasional fruit" to the list, but that's about right.

mike:

Good meat and fish are delicious when eaten raw...but most cuts of meat are too tough for me to enjoy that way, and one must be much more careful of the source.

JS

June 25, 2012
7:22 pm
mike
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Thanks, awesome website. Just ordered your book and looking forward to it.

There seems to be lots of conflicting opinions about cooking or not cooking meat... digestibility, what nutrients are lost or gained, toxins, carcinogens, optimal cooking temperatures and times, ect. It's all a bit confusing!

What is your evolutionary perspective on the matter?

June 26, 2012
1:36 am
john
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one more thing i wanna ask you J.

reading articles about fat loss they tells you to include weight training, cardio and eat 2000 Kcal a day to lose fat and build pure muscle. but i am confused here because if i do weight training then how i am gonna build muscle as there are some articles that tells you to in order to gain muscle you have to eat 500 Kcal more than your daily calorie requirement.

can you help me here...

June 26, 2012
1:28 pm
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mike:

Thank you!  Sales of TGC, T-shirts, and Amazon referrals are my sole source of income from gnolls.org, so your support is appreciated.

Evidence for human control of fire -- hearths, burned bones, etc. -- goes back a few hundred thousand years, so we've been eating cooked meat for quite a while.  (There is evidence of fire use back to perhaps 1 MYa, but it's sporadic, and it's not consistent with the hypothesis that we were always cooking our food that far back.  It's likely that we figured out how to tame and use existing fire, i.e. brush fires from lightning strikes, long before we figured out how to produce it at will.)

Nutritionally, there's no problem eating meat raw, and it means less of the fat-soluble vitamins get burned or melted away.  Cooking kills surface pathogens, and it can make tough parts more tender.  And while I don't like to turn my meat into briquettes, it's pretty clear that Paleolithic cooking didn't involve poaching, steaming, or other "gentle cooking" (which requires pottery): it involved burning stuff on sticks over a fire, or perhaps digging a pit and roasting it with coals or hot rocks.  

Given that I don't trust the provenance of most modern meats, my usual strategy is to sear the outside and leave the inside bleu -- but I don't stress too much about it.

john:

Doing cardio will impair your ability to build muscle, as will trying to lose fat.  In general, you want to choose one or the other as your goal: build muscle (in which case you lift heavy weights and eat more), or lose fat (in which case you work on your aerobic capacity and eat less).

If you want to gain muscle mass, get Dan John's Mass Made Simple and do the program.  It's not "paleo", but you can adapt his dietary prescriptions to your own needs.  (For instance, instead of peanut butter sandwiches, you could use gainer shakes of protein powder, coconut milk, and fruit.)  Then you can switch to "lose fat" mode.  Trying to do both at once is generally counterproductive.

JS

July 1, 2012
8:05 am
jamal
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Ramadan coming soon, can u tell me how should i eat to lose fat not muscle.

as you know i will be fasting for a month with no food, no water, nothing, for nearly 15 to 16 hours from sun up to sunset. any suggestions what should i eat?

should i do cardio during Ramadan?

July 1, 2012
4:47 pm
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jamal:

What I said above to ahmad still holds: eat a breakfast high in protein and fat, and eat your carbohydrates during the evening meal. 

I would imagine that a morning meal based on meat, eggs, and vegetables, prepared with butter or coconut oil, would be best.  (Remember that corn, peas, and beans aren't vegetables.)  I would stay away from sugars and starches, including fruit.  You might not be very hungry just after waking, and after eating so late...choke it down anyway.  (Since you're trying to preserve muscle mass, you'll need the protein.)  And since you're not allowed to drink water during the fast AFAIK, you'll want to drink plenty of water with the morning meal.

In the evening, you've got a lot more freedom.  Again, to preserve muscle mass, make sure to eat plenty of complete protein (meat, eggs, etc.)...but starches and fruit are fine at the evening meal, including the traditional dates to break your fast.  

In general, I believe you'll do best to follow the dietary rules from Eat Like A Predator while doing all this...but that's your decision.  

Should you do cardio?  Only if you feel up to it.  Don't go running in the morning, get hungry, and then be starving and miserable all day...and dehydration is a real danger here, since you're not allowed to drink water AFAIK.  But if it's late afternoon or evening, you're feeling good, and you're not feeling dehydrated, then sure, do some fasted exercise!

JS

July 3, 2012
2:13 pm
jamal
Guest

thank u very much J. i appreciate your answers and i will try to stick with what you said.

July 12, 2012
10:40 am
kareem
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as i am a boxer and i want to know ur opinion on heavy weight training for boxers?

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