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Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat
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May 18, 2011
5:28 pm
JKC Takes the Plunge
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[...] Found another interesting article about snacking - it says it can make you lose muscle mass: Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat - GNOLLS.ORG I sent the link to my physiologist mom to see if the science on it is accurate. Of course, rather [...]

May 23, 2011
8:16 pm
Mindless eating, and
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[...] I’ll keep you posted. Maybe I’ll discover it is my thyroid playing up or my girly hormones (or testosterone) leaving me. But first I’ll try mindful eating with meals that start with protein, as this controls my blood sugar and appetite, and stops me overeating. Read this article from J Stanton, he’s got the cool graphs that show blood sugar and hormonal consequences of different meals. The study compares a high carbohydrate grain meal to a balanced meal with protein. How heart healthy whole grains make us fat. And I’ll stop snacking! [...]

June 9, 2011
3:21 pm
Leptin Resistance -
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[...] about this leptin resistance deal, the more I think that cutting out any sort of snacking ... Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat - GNOLLS.ORG Reply With Quote   + Reply to [...]

June 10, 2011
11:18 am
James Schipper
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This is a great explanation. Definitely bookmarking it for reference.

June 11, 2011
5:20 pm
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James:

I'm glad it's useful to you...and I haven't yet seen anyone else investigate this particular angle.  The more research I do, the more I'm convinced that snacking is a major contributor to modern ill health.

Feel free to stick around! I publish new articles every Tuesday (well, sometime on Tuesday, anyway).

JS

June 13, 2011
7:56 pm
How Did Breakfast Be
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[...] Rephrased for modern humans: predators eat meals, prey grazes on snacks.” [...]

June 21, 2011
10:52 pm
Sevi Regis
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Very informative article and key points made for health, fitness, beauty, and longevity. High blood sugar is a devastating condition rising in the population more every year.

June 22, 2011
5:32 pm
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Sevi:

Thank you.  Fortunately we can control our blood sugar levels by eating less of it.

JS

June 27, 2011
4:39 pm
David Csonka
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J. - I just read this article. It was epic. Nice work!

June 27, 2011
7:36 pm
Rachel
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I have to agree, David...this was very nice work! An amazing piece!

June 28, 2011
1:11 am
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David, Rachel:

Thank you!  I'm slowly becoming convinced that snacking is a major contributor to obesity no matter what type of food you're eating.

JS

June 29, 2011
11:41 pm
Wood
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Hi. I just found your site and very interesting.

I just have a question? Why react our body so? If I eat a fruit why begin my body use my muscle?

June 30, 2011
1:34 am
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Wood:

First, because excessively high blood glucose is poisonous.  When a bunch of glucose comes into our bloodstream, our body's first priority is to get rid of it.  This is more important than a little bit of proteolysis.

Second, because healthy, active people -- like humans throughout our history as hunter-foragers -- aren't insulin-resistant (unless they're hunters in winter eating VLC, in which case they won't have fruit to eat) and can normalize their blood glucose relatively quickly, without huge insulin spikes.

Third, because Paleolithic people didn't have access to fruit juice or refined sugars.  One small 12oz can of Coca-Cola has 39g of sugar...you'd have to eat 8 cups of raspberries, or three big oranges, to get that much sugar!  (Remember that modern fruits have been bred for size and sweetness...wild fruits tend to be smaller and less sweet.)

Fourth, because protein takes a while to clear from the bloodstream.  If you've eaten substantial amounts of protein recently, odds are there's still some circulating.

In other words, the healthier you are and the more you restrict yourself to reasonable quantities of whole foods, the less of an issue it's likely to be.  Our modern situation of sedentary, insulin-resistant people with chronically full glycogen stores due to constant carbohydrate intake is novel, and not something that would have happened often in evolutionary time.  I don't turn down the opportunity to eat wild berries if I come across them! 

However, if you're looking to optimize your muscular development, it seems like it's best to only eat fruit and other carb/sugar sources with some amount of complete protein.

JS

June 30, 2011
11:24 pm
Wood
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Thanks. The more I read and ask, the more question I have. Someone said (dont remember the exact book title, but im sure it was some "how can be totaly healty 🙂 kind) Fruit must be consumed appart from any other food, before or after 2-3 hours a meal, never with fat and protein.
Vince Gironda the "iron guru" - ok maybe not nutrition guru said, that carbohydrates and proteins must be eaten separately because ch need base (alkali) protein needs acid enviroment.

July 1, 2011
2:06 am
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Wood:

There are a lot of theories about food combining, or why foods shouldn't be combined.  Most of them don't have any sound biochemistry behind them that I can see.  (Though I'm open to explanations.)

I've seen the "always eat fruits by themselves" thing before.  It is true that fructose is much more reactive than glucose, and tends to bond to proteins or fats ("glycation"), creating molecules we'd rather not have in our bloodstream.  For this reason, the Jaminets recommend eating fruit with saturated fats like cream or coconut, which slow absorption and are less prone to glycation.

Unfortunately, I'm not aware of much solid research on glycation in vivo: there are some suggestive studies, but nothing I can draw definite conclusions from.  And much of the fructose problem comes when we overload our livers by consuming too much at once (i.e. soda): otherwise it's taken right out of circulation by the liver.  So in the absence of solid evidence, I'm going with the science I understand (or think I understand).

Vince Gironda was way ahead of his time on some things, but I'm not sure what he means by acid vs. base environment.  In the stomach?  In the intestine?  In the bloodstream?  Where?

JS

July 1, 2011
3:30 am
Wood
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lol I never followed this "advice" so I never think after. If I never have learnt biology I would say in the stomach, but I dont think there can be base environment..So maybe later. But it doesnt matter, for me just other obsession. The little fruit I eat, I eat mostly after a meal as dessert.

Thanks for Your time.

July 6, 2011
9:28 pm
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Wood:

Yes, the stomach is heavily acid, and the small intestine is weakly acid.

It is true that eating meat causes your stomach to produce more acid, in order to break it down...but I'm not sure how that screws up CHO digestion.  Perhaps he was working on an early form of carb cycling and was wrong about why it works...which wouldn't surprise me.

JS

July 13, 2011
11:15 am
How Often Should You
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[...] protein. As to why, I’ll draw your attention to a brilliant post by J. Stanton, entitled “Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat.” Stanton explains why eating a carb rich snack without protein is inherently catabolic: the insulin [...]

July 13, 2011
3:17 pm
. : seattle foodster
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[...] protein. As to why, I’ll draw your attention to a brilliant post by J. Stanton, entitled “Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat.” Stanton explains why eating a carb rich snack without protein is inherently catabolic: the insulin [...]

July 13, 2011
5:49 pm
How often should you
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[...] …and you’re about to rip down a wall or tear a work colleague a new a-hole, then reach for something with protein in it. A shake with low-fat milk or something else low carb and high protein. [...]

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