Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat
sp_BlogLink Read the original blog post
July 13, 2011
5:50 pm
How often should you
Guest

[...] …and you’re about to rip down a wall or tear a work colleague a new a-hole, then reach for something with protein in it. A shake with low-fat milk or something else low carb and high protein. [...]

July 13, 2011
8:59 pm
Why snacking makes y
Guest

[...] All of us want to stay as strong and fit as we can, with as little effort as we can…and the profusion of ridiculous exercise gadgets and workout books testifies to our desire to look like fitness models, while living and eating like Homer Simpson…………………..read on HERE [...]

July 14, 2011
12:24 am
Meal Timing Concerns
Guest

[...] some protein. As to why, I’ll draw your attention to a brilliant post by J. Stanton, entitled “Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat.” Stanton explains why eating a carb rich snack without protein is inherently catabolic: the insulin [...]

July 14, 2011
1:10 am
Tomas
Guest

Wood,

I guess the book is Fit for Life from H. Diamond.

Anyway, I'll bookmark this article too, it rocks, like totally.

July 14, 2011
11:29 pm
Richard
Guest

Thanks for a very interesting article!

I have some noob questions.
If one does consume (more than a few grams of) carbohydrates in a meal is there any recommended minimum ratio of protein to carbohydrates to counteract this effect?

Also, on average how long does protein remain available in one's bloodstream? And what factors determine this rate (e.g. type of protein, activity levels, demographic factors etc). I have googled this and found wildly inconsistent answers.

I discussed this article with a colleague who is interested in health and fitness and they said one doesn't need to eat all the essential amino acids in each meal, but rather as long as you consume all the essential amino acids during the day. Would you agree?

Cheers

July 18, 2011
2:49 pm
Avatar
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2045
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Richard:

I don't know the exact ratio.

My estimate would be to take your daily protein requirement, and make sure it's distributed somewhat proportionally among the foods you eat.  So if you're targeting (for instance) 20% of calories from protein, try to keep your meals reasonably close to that.  But personally, I don't count calories or worry about macronutrients: I just make sure I'm eating some meat or eggs with every meal.  Problem solved!

That being said, if you're eating a surplus of protein, your colleague is correct that it hangs around for a while before your body gives up and converts it to glucose.  So if you've just recently eaten a steak, there's still a big amino acid pool left over for insulin to chew on.  But if you did that, why are you eating again already?

Also, I don't like counting on protein combining over time: if my body is hungry, that means it wants complete protein NOW, not later when I finally get around to compensating for a lysine-deficient grain snack.  There is indeed a lot of engineering you can do to keep yourself in complete protein from plant sources, but why bother?  It's a bunch of extra work to figure out, when you could simply eat whole paleo foods and not bother with all that calculation.

I think the biggest offender here is eating a carb-heavy breakfast, followed by mid-morning carb snacks, leaving you without meaningful or complete protein intake until lunch.  Another big offender is proteinless (or incomplete) post-workout carb snacks, i.e. treating yourself to a whole-grain bagel.

Stick around!  There's plenty more to talk about, and I update each week.

JS

July 18, 2011
6:40 pm
7/18 – Rest Da
Guest

[...] some protein. As to why, I’ll draw your attention to a brilliant post by J. Stanton, entitled “Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat.” Stanton explains why eating a carb rich snack without protein is inherently catabolic: the insulin [...]

July 18, 2011
7:27 pm
Richard
Guest

Thanks very much for your comprehensive answer John!
It certainly gells with various other articles I have been reading (e.g Mark's Daily Apple and Archevore).

I wouldn't say I have any digestive issues and am certainly not overweight (170cm, ~59kgs). My interest in this area stemmed from treatment for recurrent seborrhoeic dermatitis, which I control by diet, lifestyle and some creams which has been quite successful.

I used to follow a high carb diet without even knowing it was high carb but am shifting to a higher proportion of animal and veg protein diet. I live in Australia so we are lucky that most of our meat (beef especially) is grass-fed

Cheers!

July 19, 2011
11:11 am
California
Gnoll
Forum Posts: 35
Member Since:
June 20, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Richard said:

Thanks very much for your comprehensive answer John!

It certainly gells with various other articles I have been reading (e.g Mark's Daily Apple and Archevore).

I wouldn't say I have any digestive issues and am certainly not overweight (170cm, ~59kgs). My interest in this area stemmed from treatment for recurrent seborrhoeic dermatitis, which I control by diet, lifestyle and some creams which has been quite successful.

I used to follow a high carb diet without even knowing it was high carb but am shifting to a higher proportion of animal and veg protein diet. I live in Australia so we are lucky that most of our meat (beef especially) is grass-fed

Cheers!


Richard,

Just curious. I haven't had Kangaroo in years. Since you're in Austrailia is it still pretty easy to get?

July 19, 2011
4:28 pm
Richard
Guest

Hi Chris

Yes we can buy Kangaroo meat from our local supermarkets (Coles or Woolworths) and butchers. It is a bit cheaper than beef or lamb but I noticed its been creeping up in price since it has become more popular. Anywya it is quite tasty 🙂

Cheers

July 19, 2011
11:14 pm
Day 20: Meal Timing
Guest

[...] some protein. As to why, I’ll draw your attention to a brilliant post by J. Stanton, entitled “Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat.” Stanton explains why eating a carb rich snack without protein is inherently catabolic: [...]

July 21, 2011
10:54 pm
Richard
Guest

Hi John,
I would like clarification about one of your earlier responses (July 1st, 2011 at 2:06 am). If fructose tends to bond to proteins or fats causing glycation, it seems contradictory to me to eat fruit with saturated fats like cream or coconut. Why doesn't the ingested fructose bond with the ingested fat or is it the type of fat you eat that is more important (i.e. gycation doesn't happen between saturated fats and glucose)?

Cheers

July 22, 2011
3:44 am
Avatar
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2045
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Richard:

First, it's not John, it's J.  (There are many other first names that start with J.)

As far as your question, saturated fats are much less reactive than monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats.  Those double covalent bonds each represent a site at which another atom or molecule could attach to the fat...whereas to bond to a saturated fat, you'd have to kick one of the hydrogens off first.  The more unsaturated a fat, the more reactive it is.

Additionally, fat slows gastric emptying and the absorption of nutrients -- so the sugars will be absorbed more slowly and produce less of a blood sugar spike.

JS

July 22, 2011
3:53 pm
Richard
Guest

Thanks for the clarification about your name (apologies) and the dynamics of glycation

Cheers and have a great weekend!
Richard

August 3, 2011
8:29 pm
Janey
Guest

Hi J,
I am trying to understand what you are saying and to some extent I do.

The facts:
I am a 52 year old woman. I am 5'.4''. I now weigh 23 stone = 322lb.
I have type ll diabetes taking:
Glyclazide 80mg 2/24hrs,
I suffer from diverse pain and a worn right hip. I take:
9/24 30mg Dihydracodiene,
6/24 400 mg Ibuprphen,
1/24 10mg Amitriptyline,
I have a burprnophine 20mg weekly patch,
Blood Pressure I take:
Olmasattan Medoxomil 10mg 1/24
Angina controlled with:
Chlortalidorne 50mg 1/24

In the past 4 years I have been trying to live a life on a continuous reduced calorific diet. In 2005 I reached a massive 30 stones=420lb, by 2009 I got down to 299lb and I have been swinging between that and 322lb. For the past 5 weeks I am stuck at 322lb. I am eating no more than 1500 calories per day and on one of the weeks I stayed at 1000 calories. There is no way that I should be stuck at my current weight

If I understand your article correctly, if I can stop my blood sugars from spiking and have complete protien at every meal or food I have, I should start to lose weight easier. I guess it does make sense becasue I started to lose weight on a regular basis when I had whey protien supplement everyday.

I always eat breakfast of a healthy balance cereal with milk on it and a milky coffee, would that contain enopugh protien?

I usually have a soup and slice of bread at lunch time and for my evening meal I generally have potatos and veg, not too keen on meat. So if I continued like that but added protien to the equation, in your opinion would I lose weight and take myself under what I am stuck on?

Thank you for your time and perseverance

Kind regards

Janey

August 3, 2011
9:10 pm
What to eat the morn
Guest

[...] Times Magazine Nutrition & Metabolism | Full text | Ketogenic diets and physical performance Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat - GNOLLS.ORG Reply With Quote   + Reply to Thread « Previous Thread | [...]

August 4, 2011
11:12 am
How To Use Intermitt
Guest

[...] According to J. Stanton of Gnolls.org snacking not only makes you fat…it makes you weak as well. [...]

August 6, 2011
8:14 pm
What Was It About To
Guest

[...] | Full text | Ketogenic diets and physical performance Running on Empty | Running Times Magazine Why Snacking Makes You Weak, Not Just Fat - GNOLLS.ORG Reply With Quote   + Reply to Thread « Previous Thread | [...]

August 7, 2011
12:33 pm
Avatar
First-Eater
Forum Posts: 2045
Member Since:
February 22, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Janey:

I've been at the AHS conference and haven't had the time to reply, and I'm still on the road.  I'll give you a more comprehensive reply in a few days...but in the meantime, yes, it's best to make sure you have complete protein with whatever you eat.  That's only one part of the puzzle, but it's an important part.

Furthermore, I recommend that you get that complete protein from whole foods, and not supplements like whey protein: meat and eggs are your best sources.  (Liquid foods like milk, with the exception of soup, aren't a great idea for weight loss: it's easy to consume lots of calories very quickly, which short-circuits the satiation response.)  If you eat breakfast on the go and don't have time to cook, hard-boiled eggs are a great solution.

There is a lot more to say here, which I'll get to in a few days when I'm back at home and well-rested.  Where did you find out about gnolls.org?

JS

August 7, 2011
2:41 pm
Having Second Though
Guest

[...] [...]

Forum Timezone: America/Los_Angeles

Most Users Ever Online: 183

Currently Online:
2 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1763

Members: 5334

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 2

Topics: 250

Posts: 7101

Administrators: J. Stanton: 2045